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Messages - OldTimeHockey

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1
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: The End of Meat
« on: Today at 04:24:32 PM »
If I cut out beef and cheese, I would just do full vegetarian, or vegan. I can easily live without chicken, pork, fish, and other animal protein. I buy quarter cows from local farms to fill my freezer. I do try to fit in a couple of days a week meat-free and have played with the idea of cutting meat out entirely, but not sure I would be capable of that.

How much space does a quarter-cow take up? The farm I buy from offers them and I'm tempted but not sure I have the freezer space.

I've purchased one for the first time this year. It's going to be tight!

2
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Today at 07:32:26 AM »
The latest from the shower that call themselves the British government:

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/may/24/boris-johnson-defence-dominic-cummings-anger-from-allies-and-opponents-alike

After putting in place a lockdown and barring people from even doing things like attending funerals of their own family as part of that lockdown, the Prime Ministerís own chief of staff decided to make multiple 260+ mile journeys across the country (with his wife) *both while showing symptoms of the coronavirus*.

Now you would think that like the scientific advisers who had done the same for undermining the lockdown advice (and not even while potentially infected with the virus and spreading it across the country) that would be at least worth an apology and a resignation. ( https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-52553229 and https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-52177171 )

But oh no.

Quote
the prime minister said on Sunday that Cummings had ďacted responsibly, legally and with integrityĒ.

Even the more extreme right wing press including the Daily Mail has said this is a step too far for a pretty horrific attempt at a government and there has been a pretty big backlash from within the Conservative party.

In a way I feel like the Cummings stuff is sort of a perfect encapsulation of what I'm talking about. His defenders are saying that, you know, it was reasonable to have the concerns he did and the risk wasn't very high for him or his family.

But, again, the issue is always going to be about whether or not what's relatively safe for one person to do is safe for everyone to do and if everyone who got sick decided to go for long drives, well, it wouldn't be safe. That's why any guideline or even rule is useless without enforcement.

Right now Rob Ford is constantly talking about how he's reluctant to impose on commercial landlords something that would stop them from kicking out tenants and hopes they'll just choose to do the "right" thing on their own. I'm really not sure how much more evidence we need that people aren't choosing the right things and actual enforceable regulation is the only real way out of this.

Rob Ford as well as Justin Trudeau and other politicians are playing a political game with this. They are using it as an opportunity to gain votes. So, when it comes to making the real tough decisions, they sit on the fence and hope that both sides figure it out oni their own so they can take credit for over seeing it.

3
Judging by the crimes against humanity that have occurred since the beginning of time, all in the name of power and wealth, I'd call the surprise, naivety.

As much as I'm heartened by another warrior in the proletariat's war against the owners, I still think the point should get back to the fact that a handful of games played by middling teams won't add much revenue vs. a standard 16 team format. With TV money evenly split and the sort of logistical issues with involving more teams, I'd really question if it was even a net gain.

Whether its a sound business decision or not remains to be seen. They didn't become "outrageously wealthy" with no business acumen, though I'm sure they've made some poor business decisions over the years.

4
That's 100% what I've been trying to say though I guess I haven't articulated it well.

I guess what I'm saying is that considering we live in a society where a vast amount of wealth is in the hands of people who don't care if we live or die so long as their stock portfolio keeps increasing in value but despite that people haven't risen up and Robespierred the lot of them you also shouldn't be surprised that people might be surprised by the depths to which the capitalist class can sink.

Judging by the crimes against humanity that have occurred since the beginning of time, all in the name of power and wealth, I'd call the surprise, naivety.

5
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Yesterday at 11:12:52 AM »

I feel like I covered that in my first six words.

Of course you did.

6
We can question the ethics of the decision all we want, but we can't be surprised that 'outrageously wealthy people" are making decisions based on dollars and cents and not on the overall wellbeing of the population or for that matter, their employees.

Now, if you want to say people shouldn't be surprised by that given the inherently exploitative nature of capitalism and particularly the greed on display in our late stage capitalism then I am 100% with you comrade and I think that's why you're seeing growing popular support for actual measures to address the balance of power in our society and redistribute wealth away from the bosses.

That's 100% what I've been trying to say though I guess I haven't articulated it well.

7
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Yesterday at 08:06:56 AM »

I'm all for calling these people idiots, because they are, but I think this highlights a problem we're seeing in a lot of places. You can't partially open stuff without enforcement. You can't say "Beaches are open but only at 33% of regular capacity" without figuring out who gets to go and who doesn't. Because otherwise everyone is going to think they get to go to the beach that day.

And people can blame Toronto all they want but a lack of enforcement of guidelines has been plaguing the provincial response since the beginning.

You can call it whatever you like. But when a good chunk of the province is following the rules and their case numbers show it, yet you watch the protests in Toronto, and the idiots in that park, I think we are within our rights to call them a$$holes.

8
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 24, 2020, 12:40:07 PM »
This is bad...

Which brings us back to the past couple posts....My business, and other businesses in Northern Ontario will continue to struggle because of a$$hole decisions in Toronto.

9
I didn't say anything about struggling small business owners.

What I don't see the difference between is places like Walmart, Costco, etc; and what they've done to continue making money and what the NHL is trying to do.

You asked why anyone would expect these teams to behave differently than other "businesses". And the answer to that is that most businesses need to be open to survive. Most aren't owned privately by outrageously wealthy people.

Or, in some cases, like Walmart's and Cost-cos. They sell things like, you know, food and diapers and stuff. The NHL, love it though I do, is fairly superfluous right now and maybe not worth the health risk.

Like I said, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, but I can understand why a business would want to recover some lost revenue.

Like I said though, I'm not sure what extra revenue you see in a few teams playing a handful of games with no fans in a neutral site.

Again, I'm not saying that I agree with them doing it. All I said is I'm not shocked they are trying to do it. Whether a business sells, diapers, food, entertainment, socks, or flowers, their goal, as a business, is to make money. Whether they need the money or not to survive, is irrelevant. These "outrageously wealthy people" didn't become that way by allowing opportunities to make money pass them by.

We can question the ethics of the decision all we want, but we can't be surprised that 'outrageously wealthy people" are making decisions based on dollars and cents and not on the overall wellbeing of the population or for that matter, their employees.

10
What does that have to do with anything?

You don't see the difference between a corner restaurant needing to open so that the owner doesn't lose his business and is able to pay his mortgage and a hockey team playing a handful of games so that the owner's net worth changes by something like .0001%? Within the context of saying that these businesses "need" to make this money?

It is not unreasonable for someone to look at a NHL team and think they might want to put health and safety over making a tiny bit of revenue in a way that does not apply to a struggling small business owner.

I didn't say anything about struggling small business owners.

What I don't see the difference between is places like Walmart, Costco, etc; and what they've done to continue making money and what the NHL is trying to do.

Like I said, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, but I can understand why a business would want to recover some lost revenue.

11
While, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, I'm not really surprised by it. These teams are businesses that need to make money.
Businesses through out North America are working their hardest to make money and coming up with all kinds of ideas to get it done. Not sure why anyone would expect these NHL businesses to behave any differently.

Most businesses in North America aren't sports franchises where the year to year profitability isn't going to make or break anyone with a financial stake in them.

What does that have to do with anything?

12
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 23, 2020, 07:00:31 AM »
Although does that stop Toronto crazies from driving to Kingston and infecting people?

That's the problem I see if certain cities opened up and others didn't. I mean, I'd love to see hockey arenas open here in Sudbury so we can get back on the ice but I also know that people would flock to the area to also get back on the ice.

13
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 22, 2020, 04:27:17 PM »
And I'm sorry, the uptick in cases has nothing to do with the retail stores opening Tuesday. Whether or not Ontario was ready is another discussion, but cases going up by 75 people isn't because stores opened 3 days ago.

That's true - we won't have those numbers for a couple weeks. However, Home Depot, Lowe's, Canadian Tire, etc. opened for shoppers right around two weeks ago, and the people testing positive now would have been infected right around then. Could be correlation without causation, but, it's not a good look.

I think the biggest issue is that they don't know where the infections are coming from now. The health units need to do a better job of tracing where they are actually coming from? It's a little mind boggling.
Is it a factor of people not following the rules? Is it the fact that garden centres opened on Mother's Day? Is it a little bit of everything and everyone dropping the ball?

In the past 2 weeks, I have seen numerous backyard parties, packs of children riding around on bikes, and countless groups walking together for exercise.

We have seen a sharp decline in Northern Ontario in both the Sudbury Health District and the Timmins Health District. there's only 8 active cases in these two areas. In the Sudbury area, there has not been a case reported outside of a long-term care home since April 28th. There's been around 10 cases found in Long-Term care homes since that date. It has certainly flattened up here. Though, testing has never been very substantial up here out of fear of overrunning the hospitals. It would be nice if they were able to open up cities though I'm not sure how we could safely do that.

14
While, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, I'm not really surprised by it. These teams are businesses that need to make money.
Businesses through out North America are working their hardest to make money and coming up with all kinds of ideas to get it done. Not sure why anyone would expect these NHL businesses to behave any differently.

15
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 22, 2020, 04:00:19 PM »

Ontario wasn't ready for its reopening.

Totally see things rolling back and shutting down again. 

441 new reported cases today. That's the highest number in 2 weeks.

And that's with doing only 11,000 tests.

Yesterday's tests aren't today's results.

5,516 tests are still under investigation.

And I'm sorry, the uptick in cases has nothing to do with the retail stores opening Tuesday. Whether or not Ontario was ready is another discussion, but cases going up by 75 people isn't because stores opened 3 days ago.

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