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Messages - OldTimeHockey

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1
Judging by the crimes against humanity that have occurred since the beginning of time, all in the name of power and wealth, I'd call the surprise, naivety.

As much as I'm heartened by another warrior in the proletariat's war against the owners, I still think the point should get back to the fact that a handful of games played by middling teams won't add much revenue vs. a standard 16 team format. With TV money evenly split and the sort of logistical issues with involving more teams, I'd really question if it was even a net gain.

Whether its a sound business decision or not remains to be seen. They didn't become "outrageously wealthy" with no business acumen, though I'm sure they've made some poor business decisions over the years.

2
That's 100% what I've been trying to say though I guess I haven't articulated it well.

I guess what I'm saying is that considering we live in a society where a vast amount of wealth is in the hands of people who don't care if we live or die so long as their stock portfolio keeps increasing in value but despite that people haven't risen up and Robespierred the lot of them you also shouldn't be surprised that people might be surprised by the depths to which the capitalist class can sink.

Judging by the crimes against humanity that have occurred since the beginning of time, all in the name of power and wealth, I'd call the surprise, naivety.

3
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Today at 11:12:52 AM »

I feel like I covered that in my first six words.

Of course you did.

4
We can question the ethics of the decision all we want, but we can't be surprised that 'outrageously wealthy people" are making decisions based on dollars and cents and not on the overall wellbeing of the population or for that matter, their employees.

Now, if you want to say people shouldn't be surprised by that given the inherently exploitative nature of capitalism and particularly the greed on display in our late stage capitalism then I am 100% with you comrade and I think that's why you're seeing growing popular support for actual measures to address the balance of power in our society and redistribute wealth away from the bosses.

That's 100% what I've been trying to say though I guess I haven't articulated it well.

5
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Today at 08:06:56 AM »

I'm all for calling these people idiots, because they are, but I think this highlights a problem we're seeing in a lot of places. You can't partially open stuff without enforcement. You can't say "Beaches are open but only at 33% of regular capacity" without figuring out who gets to go and who doesn't. Because otherwise everyone is going to think they get to go to the beach that day.

And people can blame Toronto all they want but a lack of enforcement of guidelines has been plaguing the provincial response since the beginning.

You can call it whatever you like. But when a good chunk of the province is following the rules and their case numbers show it, yet you watch the protests in Toronto, and the idiots in that park, I think we are within our rights to call them a$$holes.

6
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: Yesterday at 12:40:07 PM »
This is bad...

Which brings us back to the past couple posts....My business, and other businesses in Northern Ontario will continue to struggle because of a$$hole decisions in Toronto.

7
I didn't say anything about struggling small business owners.

What I don't see the difference between is places like Walmart, Costco, etc; and what they've done to continue making money and what the NHL is trying to do.

You asked why anyone would expect these teams to behave differently than other "businesses". And the answer to that is that most businesses need to be open to survive. Most aren't owned privately by outrageously wealthy people.

Or, in some cases, like Walmart's and Cost-cos. They sell things like, you know, food and diapers and stuff. The NHL, love it though I do, is fairly superfluous right now and maybe not worth the health risk.

Like I said, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, but I can understand why a business would want to recover some lost revenue.

Like I said though, I'm not sure what extra revenue you see in a few teams playing a handful of games with no fans in a neutral site.

Again, I'm not saying that I agree with them doing it. All I said is I'm not shocked they are trying to do it. Whether a business sells, diapers, food, entertainment, socks, or flowers, their goal, as a business, is to make money. Whether they need the money or not to survive, is irrelevant. These "outrageously wealthy people" didn't become that way by allowing opportunities to make money pass them by.

We can question the ethics of the decision all we want, but we can't be surprised that 'outrageously wealthy people" are making decisions based on dollars and cents and not on the overall wellbeing of the population or for that matter, their employees.

8
What does that have to do with anything?

You don't see the difference between a corner restaurant needing to open so that the owner doesn't lose his business and is able to pay his mortgage and a hockey team playing a handful of games so that the owner's net worth changes by something like .0001%? Within the context of saying that these businesses "need" to make this money?

It is not unreasonable for someone to look at a NHL team and think they might want to put health and safety over making a tiny bit of revenue in a way that does not apply to a struggling small business owner.

I didn't say anything about struggling small business owners.

What I don't see the difference between is places like Walmart, Costco, etc; and what they've done to continue making money and what the NHL is trying to do.

Like I said, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, but I can understand why a business would want to recover some lost revenue.

9
While, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, I'm not really surprised by it. These teams are businesses that need to make money.
Businesses through out North America are working their hardest to make money and coming up with all kinds of ideas to get it done. Not sure why anyone would expect these NHL businesses to behave any differently.

Most businesses in North America aren't sports franchises where the year to year profitability isn't going to make or break anyone with a financial stake in them.

What does that have to do with anything?

10
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 23, 2020, 07:00:31 AM »
Although does that stop Toronto crazies from driving to Kingston and infecting people?

That's the problem I see if certain cities opened up and others didn't. I mean, I'd love to see hockey arenas open here in Sudbury so we can get back on the ice but I also know that people would flock to the area to also get back on the ice.

11
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 22, 2020, 04:27:17 PM »
And I'm sorry, the uptick in cases has nothing to do with the retail stores opening Tuesday. Whether or not Ontario was ready is another discussion, but cases going up by 75 people isn't because stores opened 3 days ago.

That's true - we won't have those numbers for a couple weeks. However, Home Depot, Lowe's, Canadian Tire, etc. opened for shoppers right around two weeks ago, and the people testing positive now would have been infected right around then. Could be correlation without causation, but, it's not a good look.

I think the biggest issue is that they don't know where the infections are coming from now. The health units need to do a better job of tracing where they are actually coming from? It's a little mind boggling.
Is it a factor of people not following the rules? Is it the fact that garden centres opened on Mother's Day? Is it a little bit of everything and everyone dropping the ball?

In the past 2 weeks, I have seen numerous backyard parties, packs of children riding around on bikes, and countless groups walking together for exercise.

We have seen a sharp decline in Northern Ontario in both the Sudbury Health District and the Timmins Health District. there's only 8 active cases in these two areas. In the Sudbury area, there has not been a case reported outside of a long-term care home since April 28th. There's been around 10 cases found in Long-Term care homes since that date. It has certainly flattened up here. Though, testing has never been very substantial up here out of fear of overrunning the hospitals. It would be nice if they were able to open up cities though I'm not sure how we could safely do that.

12
While, I'm not a fan of the suggestion, I'm not really surprised by it. These teams are businesses that need to make money.
Businesses through out North America are working their hardest to make money and coming up with all kinds of ideas to get it done. Not sure why anyone would expect these NHL businesses to behave any differently.

13
Non-Hockey Chatter / Re: Coronavirus
« on: May 22, 2020, 04:00:19 PM »

Ontario wasn't ready for its reopening.

Totally see things rolling back and shutting down again. 

441 new reported cases today. That's the highest number in 2 weeks.

And that's with doing only 11,000 tests.

Yesterday's tests aren't today's results.

5,516 tests are still under investigation.

And I'm sorry, the uptick in cases has nothing to do with the retail stores opening Tuesday. Whether or not Ontario was ready is another discussion, but cases going up by 75 people isn't because stores opened 3 days ago.

14
Main Leafs Hockey Talk / Re: Nick Robertson signed to 3 yr ELC
« on: May 20, 2020, 09:21:15 AM »
https://theathletic.com/1814091/2020/05/19/im-ready-right-now-nick-robertson-says-hes-ready-to-join-the-maple-leafs/

Quote
“Practice is a business for me. Working out is a business for me. Sleeping is a business for me. Everything I do is for a reason,” said Robertson.

[...]

“Some guys come into this league and have a good time,” said Robertson. “But I’m here as a temporary stop. This is just the car to get me to the NHL. Let’s put it that way.”

[...]

When he’s not practising his shot, Robertson now spends his days trying to increase his mobility and strength. He’s asked if the workout plan he’s following was provided to him by the Leafs or the Petes.

“It’s all the Maple Leafs,” said Robertson.

He’s trying to figure out where he fits in the Leafs possession-heavy system. He asked his agency to send him video detailing how the Leafs’ system functions.

He appreciates how much stock the Leafs place on video analysis as well. He recalls being asked strange questions by NHL teams at the 2019 NHL draft combine, including one around whether he would share water with a person if it meant they would both die together, or whether he would keep the water for himself, live, and watch the other person die.

But the Leafs, as Robertson recalled, were the only team that based their entire combine interview with him on his reaction to video clips of Marlies and Leafs games. He was asked what he thought should happen next in different plays.

I love his intensity. All business.

15
Main Leafs Hockey Talk / Re: Paul McFarland heading back to the OHL
« on: May 16, 2020, 01:36:22 PM »

Jack Han, former Minute Tactics video guy turned Leafs hockey ops/dev assistant, then Marlies assistant coach this past season is now a free agent, and thus back to writing. His latest touches on the Leafs powerplay and the nuances of inverting wingers.

If your winger is a shooter, then having them on their off wing can be a bonus. Any powerplay I've ran, I've always inverted my wingers.

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