TMLfans.ca

Just for Fun => Non-Hockey Chatter => Topic started by: Tigger on March 31, 2012, 12:29:37 PM

Title: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on March 31, 2012, 12:29:37 PM
Decided to resurrect an old thread idea.

Anyone heard of Gobekli Tepe? Fascinating archaeological find in Turkey (1995) that is turning heads. Carbon dated to around 10,000 bce, the semi unearthed megalithic structures suggest a whole different perspective of what our ancestors were and what they were doing.

The site was intentionally buried around 8,000 bce, no one is sure why.

The structures are circles, Stonehenge-esque, made of sharp edged 10-15 ton monoliths, with bas-relief carvings ( images below ).

The really interesting part to me is that this kind of organized building indicates more than a 'hunter gatherer' society well before most 'established' or 'accepted' time lines.

(http://s2.hubimg.com/u/724517_f260.jpg)

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/02/27/article-0-03B05683000005DC-812_306x516.jpg)

(http://media.smithsonianmag.com/images/gobeklitepe_nov08_2.jpg)

To Schmidt and others, these new findings suggest a novel theory of civilization. Scholars have long believed that only after people learned to farm and live in settled communities did they have the time, organization and resources to construct temples and support complicated social structures. But Schmidt argues it was the other way around: the extensive, coordinated effort to build the monoliths literally laid the groundwork for the development of complex societies. (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/gobekli-tepe.html?c=y&page=1)

Next up: Derinkuyu Underground City
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on March 31, 2012, 03:11:19 PM
I'm familiar with this and a few other cases like it.

The ancient aliens theory is pretty popular, the whole think is fascinating to me.

I think perhaps as you say we had a much more advanced society than the hunter gatherer story we've long been led to believe.  If that's the case, perhaps they where subject to an extinction event caused by nature or their own dabbling in technology.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on March 31, 2012, 03:20:58 PM
Robert Schoch is hypothesizing that the last ice age ended dramatically, in maybe a period of less than 3 years, due to a coronal mass ejection, something that would literally dwarf the Carrington event back in 1859.

Schoch is the PHD geologist ( Yale graduate ) that challenged the accepted age of the Sphinx in the early 90's before Gobekli Tepe was discovered. He suggested water erosion indicated that it was much older and at the time was ridiculed by many who argued 'there's no evidence of a civilization that could have done this'.

Carbon dating at Gobekli ( something unavailable with the Sphinx ) has so far proven otherwise.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on March 31, 2012, 03:31:23 PM
Graham Hancock also has some pretty interesting stuff on ancient civilizations, you should check out his work, Fingerprints of the Gods especially.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on March 31, 2012, 03:51:56 PM
Graham Hancock also has some pretty interesting stuff on ancient civilizations, you should check out his work, Fingerprints of the Gods especially.

I get his science report once a week! :)

Mostly because I'm lazy and it's usually full of very interesting new stuff/links, and, it's pretty much not about him at all. ( as in, he's not promoting anything but science ).

The last roundup had an interesting article about how the Madagascar colony was started by a small group of Indonesian women 1200 years ago, and a scary one about the Titanoboa ( I think the two hour special is tomorrow on the Smithsonian channel ) supposedly bigger in real life than the absurdly huge Anaconda at the end of that movie. ( though airing a show like that on April 1st gives me pause ;) )

Hancock has an astounding body of work, his work on precession with sites from around the world is pretty interesting stuff.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: TheMightyOdin on March 31, 2012, 08:31:35 PM
Ive been a fan of Graham Hancock ever since hearing him speak on Joe Rogans podcast.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 03, 2012, 04:09:41 PM
I know I said Derinkuyu would be my next post but this was too startling not to share...

Mind-bending ‘psychotronic’ guns that can effectively turn people into zombies have been given the go-ahead by Russian president Vladimir Putin.
The futuristic weapons – which will attack the central nervous system of their victims – are being developed by the country’s scientists.

...

Research into electromagnetic weapons has been secretly carried out in the US and Russia since the Fifties. But now it appears Mr Putin has stolen a march on the Americans. Precise details of the Russian gun have not been revealed. However, previous research has shown that low-frequency waves or beams can affect brain cells, alter psychological states and make it possible to transmit suggestions and commands directly into someone’s thought processes. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2123415/Putin-targets-foes-zombie-gun-attack-victims-central-nervous-system.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Damian on April 04, 2012, 11:26:52 AM
So much for the demonstrators....
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: brothert on April 04, 2012, 11:35:05 AM
So much for the demonstrators....
we've already got our tinfoil helmets on.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Damian on April 04, 2012, 02:40:38 PM
So much for the demonstrators....
we've already got our tinfoil helmets on.

(http://thechive.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/a-nerds-dorks-15.jpg)

heh heh
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on April 04, 2012, 11:25:11 PM
Anyone a fan of speculative technologies?

http://www.ted.com/talks/ray_kurzweil_on_how_technology_will_transform_us.html

Huge fan of Ray Kurzweil.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on April 05, 2012, 02:30:38 AM
Transcendent Man was great Bender.  Along these lines Google released a video today, it features glasses that are working on right now that basically replace a smart phone.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on April 05, 2012, 01:27:36 PM
I think the whole idea of the exponential growth of technology is amazing, and one that I think is an elusive obvious. Every piece of technology that is adopted becomes the backbone for the next innovation until there is a new paradigm shift.

It's interesting that people still talk about some things like they won't see them in their lifetimes. Nobody thought we'd be able to clone an animal in our lifetimes a short while ago - same goes with the genome project.

I think Kurzweil is right, in just 15-20 years I think we'll see an enormous leap in technological advancement.

I find it funny though, that some people are actually bemoaning this (even though it's pretty much inevitable). "Only rich people will benefit" - the stats prove otherwise, there are fewer living in poverty BECAUSE of technology.

"We're going to lose our humanity" - Yeah, well if you're so worried about that then why aren't you living in a forest, hunting and foraging for your food, because thats what the human body was essentially adapting to. And while you're at it, you can have your 25 year life expectancy back.

Sorry, I'm a bit of a futurist geek myself. I'll probably be picking up The Singularity is Near soon :)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Madferret on April 05, 2012, 01:59:50 PM
I think the whole idea of the exponential growth of technology is amazing, and one that I think is an elusive obvious. Every piece of technology that is adopted becomes the backbone for the next innovation until there is a new paradigm shift.

It's interesting that people still talk about some things like they won't see them in their lifetimes. Nobody thought we'd be able to clone an animal in our lifetimes a short while ago - same goes with the genome project.

I think Kurzweil is right, in just 15-20 years I think we'll see an enormous leap in technological advancement.

I find it funny though, that some people are actually bemoaning this (even though it's pretty much inevitable). "Only rich people will benefit" - the stats prove otherwise, there are fewer living in poverty BECAUSE of technology.

"We're going to lose our humanity" - Yeah, well if you're so worried about that then why aren't you living in a forest, hunting and foraging for your food, because thats what the human body was essentially adapting to. And while you're at it, you can have your 25 year life expectancy back.

Sorry, I'm a bit of a futurist geek myself. I'll probably be picking up The Singularity is Near soon :)

Hey Einstein what are the 7 major modes?  ;p
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 06, 2012, 05:56:09 AM
Interesting study shows that carbon dioxide and not changing climatic trends responsible for the demise of the last ice age.  Skeptics who believe that global warming is just a natural part of climatic change occurrences, now cannot ignore the fact that CO2 (chemical symbol for carbon dioxide) may have been more so the culprit in triggering weather circumstances that led to the melting of the last ice age, some 10,000-20,000 years ago.

What does this findings implications have for Earth and the state of our climate?

A significant increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, rather than changes to the Earth's orbit, was likely the main cause of global warming that ended the last ice age, a new study has found.

"It's obviously a significant change for the planet… I think this just provides a very palpable, tangible example of what rising CO2 can mean for the planet over the long term."

The analysis of historic temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide data teased out of 80 ice and sediment cores from around the world also strongly discredits an argument used by some global warming skeptics to support the belief that rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere does not cause the Earth to warm.

As the ice age came to a close, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rose from 180 parts per million to 260 parts per million over around 7,000 years.

Shakun said current carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are around 390 parts per million, and they've risen about 100 parts per million over the last century, comparable to the amount they rose when the last ice age ended. However, he said, it will take centuries to see all the effects of the recent and the continuing increase in carbon dioxide levels, due to the "huge amount of inertia" within the Earth's climate systems.

While the current increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been caused by human activity, Shakun said it's not clear exactly what caused the rise at the end of the last ice age.

However, the theory is that the changes to the Earth's orbit caused more sunlight to hit the northern hemisphere, melting some of the ice sheets. The influx of freshwater into the North Atlantic disrupted ocean currents, causing the northern hemisphere to cool and the southern hemisphere to warm. The warming in the southern hemisphere may have allowed carbon dioxide to escape from the depths of the southern oceans by melting the sea ice that capped the oceans and kept the carbon dioxide trapped. Higher temperatures may also have strengthened winds that could help pull the carbon dioxide from the water into the atmosphere.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/04/05/environment-climate-co2-ice-age-end.html (http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/04/05/environment-climate-co2-ice-age-end.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 07, 2012, 04:08:11 PM
It's one of the most controversial points in science right now, but that study by Shakun has already had a healthy dose of skepticism, one person even went to the trouble of showing all of the global temperature proxies alongside the rise of CO2 going back to 25k BCE, it's troubling because it shows the proxies are a bit all over the map but it also shows that warming likely preceded the rise of CO2.

(http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/nature_shakun_proxies_plus_data.jpg)

Something that seems to be entirely missing from Shakuns work is consideration for CO2 contribution from increased volcanism during deglaciation. In the conclusion of Huybers/Langmuir 2009 Harvard paper "Feedback between deglaciation, volcanism and atmospheric CO2" (http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/3659701/Huybers_FeedbackDeglaciation.pdf?sequence=1) the authors cite an estimated rise of between 20 and 80 ppm during a period of about 5 thousand years. Of course the problem there is that warming had to take effect to melt the ice before that cycle began.

To me, the cause of the end of the last ice age ( actually the 'interglacial', we're still in that ice age ) is still roughly pointing at increased levels of solar radiation.

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 08, 2012, 06:03:10 PM
For any that care here's a link to Shakun's paper...

http://sciences.blogs.liberation.fr/files/shakun-et-al.pdf
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 08, 2012, 09:33:19 PM
Shakun does point out that "CO2 was not the cause of initial warming".  And that "the overall correlation and phasing of global temperature and Co2 Are consistent with Co2 being an important driverfg of global warming during the deglaciation, with the centennial-scale lag of temperature behind Co2 being consistent with the thermal inertia of the climate system owing to ocean heat uptake and ice melting".

Earlier, he had said that "the role of Co2 in glacial cycles, however, remains unclear...proxy data have variously interpreted to suggest that Co2 was the primary driver of the ice ages, a more modest feedback on warming, or perhaps, largely a consequence rather than cause of past global change".

One can conclude that there were a number of factors that led to deglaciation/oceanic temperature changes, et al, with Co2 being either a culprit or initiator of conseqental climactic changes. 
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 15, 2012, 04:21:41 AM
How's this for getting oneself off of not paying a traffic ticket...(maybe we should all become physicists)...

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/motoramic/physicist-claims-victory-over-traffic-ticket-physics-paper-151808710.html

http://www.physicscentral.com/buzz/blog/index.cfm?postid=4656335810518469535
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 28, 2012, 01:45:40 PM
Of quarks and matter....

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/04/27/subatomic-particle-discovered.html

European researchers say they have discovered a new subatomic particle that helps confirm our knowledge about how quarks bind – one of the basic forces in the shaping of matter.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, said Friday the particle was discovered at one of CERN's two main experiments involving thousands of researchers, in collaboration with the University of Zurich.

Joe Incandela, the physicist in charge of the experiment involved with the discovery, told The Associated Press the particle was predicted long ago but finding it was "really kind of a classic tour de force of experimental work."

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 06, 2012, 05:54:46 PM
Ugh, still haven't done the Derinkuyu post but this was pretty interesting, oldest known musical instruments...

The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens.

Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18196349)

I've seen a replica of one being played that was dated around 35,000 bce, it had a complete pentatonic scale and the fellow played the Star Spangled Banner melody on it. ( from the movie 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams' by Werner Herzog )
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Madferret on June 07, 2012, 07:51:03 AM
Ugh, still haven't done the Derinkuyu post but this was pretty interesting, oldest known musical instruments...

The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens.

Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18196349)

I've seen a replica of one being played that was dated around 35,000 bce, it had a complete pentatonic scale and the fellow played the Star Spangled Banner melody on it. ( from the movie 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams' by Werner Herzog )

All flutes have 5 holes!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 14, 2012, 12:49:23 PM
(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/533364_399880703397451_1779303691_n.jpg)

Fun photo along the 'as above, so below' vein.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 14, 2012, 04:26:42 PM
Cappadocia is a historical region in one of Turkey's provinces, it is has a popular tourist trade due to many unique geological, cultural and historic features, not the least of which is a vast collection of underground cities. The one I've been reading about the most is located below the town and district of Derinkuyu, though it is connected to other underground cities as well, 36 of which have been located and many more are suspected to exist.

Derinkuyu, discovered in 1963, is a massive ancient marvel. So far 11 levels have been discovered though estimates of future excavation indicate that they may have only uncovered roughly 15% of the structure. 8 of the levels are open to the public.

I've read different estimates of the capacity of Derinkuyu, the one that seems the most likely so far is that it could house 20 - 30,000 people with enough food storage to survive 8 months but that number has been speculated to be much higher given the estimate of the potential size of the city.

There is a cruciform church, chapels, stables, wine/oil press, even a suspected brewery aside from domestic accommodations. So far the deepest people have gone is to the bottom of an 85 meter ventilation shaft. The city had an independent water supply as well as plenty of fresh air from dozens of deep ventilation shafts.

There is a tunnel connecting the city to another underground site 9km away at Kaymakli and it's suspected to connect with many others as well, perhaps all of them. So far, of the 36 known cities only 3 have been explored to a reasonable degree.

The age of the structure is up for debate, some linking it to the Hittites around 1400 bce which seems to be the most commonly accepted theory but it could be much older.

The city didn't have one entrance but rather many and it was discovered quite by accident. A resident broke through a wall at the back of his house and discovered a room he'd never seen before, then another and so on.

Below is an entrance to the city, you can see the large round rock that could be put in place to close it in case of unwanted visitors, every entrance has one.

(http://www.goreme.com/derinkuyu-underground-1.jpg)

A view of another entrance showing the refined work of the levels below.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-KO3kxI8b-bo/TX6AwjBp06I/AAAAAAAAAXI/BBhXNe2CeGQ/s1600/Kaymakli%2BUnderground%2BCity%255B1%255D.jpg)

Intricate support structures and clean, navigable corridors.

(http://www.pacal.de/derinkuyu.jpg)

Precisely cut blocks in one of the kitchens.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-B-wLNc2j0Kg/TbY789feKuI/AAAAAAAAFLg/35I3lD4Q8eY/s640/IMG_0531.jpg)

One of the stables.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-3q0YQEI3Vh4/TX6AwqMUSMI/AAAAAAAAAXQ/Ubi0Y01mrXw/s1600/cappadocia_kaymakli_underground_city_00056.jpg)

One of many ventilation shafts.

(http://cache.virtualtourist.com/6/4024383-Ventilation_shaft_plunges_80_meters_into_the_earth_Derinkuyu.jpg)

A truly remarkable place with a story that's yet to be fully understood.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 15, 2012, 04:32:09 PM
Turkey continues to be a hotbed of archaeology... (http://phys.org/news/2011-12-oldest-obsidian-bracelet-reveals-amazing.html)

Quote
Dated to 7500 BC, the obsidian bracelet studied by the researchers is unique. It is the earliest evidence of obsidian working, which only reached its peak in the seventh and sixth millennia BC with the production of all kinds of ornamental objects, including mirrors and vessels.

...

This process has revealed that the bracelet was made using highly specialized manufacturing techniques. The analyses carried out showed that the bracelet was almost perfectly regular. The symmetry of the central annular ridge is extremely precise, to the nearest degree and nearest hundred micrometers. This suggests that the artisans of the time used models to control its shape when it was being made. The surface finish of the bracelet (which is very regular, resembling a mirror) required the use of complex polishing techniques capable of obtaining a nanometer-scale surface quality worthy of today's telescope lenses.

(http://cdn.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/2011/1-oldestobsidi.jpg)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on June 23, 2012, 02:30:42 PM
Wow!  Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) filmed by a Swedish photographer as it happened....

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/video/northern-lights-display-captured-film-180019407.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 24, 2012, 09:27:06 AM
Evidence of cosmic impact supporting the Younger Dryas Boundary theory (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120611193657.htm)

Quote
An 18-member international team of researchers that includes James Kennett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has discovered melt-glass material in a thin layer of sedimentary rock in Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Syria. According to the researchers, the material -- which dates back nearly 13,000 years -- was formed at temperatures of 1,700 to 2,200 degrees Celsius (3,100 to 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), and is the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth.

These new data are the latest to strongly support the controversial Younger Dryas Boundary (YDB) hypothesis, which proposes that a cosmic impact occurred 12,900 years ago at the onset of an unusual cold climatic period called the Younger Dryas. This episode occurred at or close to the time of major extinction of the North American megafauna, including mammoths and giant ground sloths; and the disappearance of the prehistoric and widely distributed Clovis culture. The researchers' findings appear June 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"These scientists have identified three contemporaneous levels more than 12,000 years ago, on two continents yielding siliceous scoria-like objects (SLO's)," said H. Richard Lane, program director of National Science Foundation's Division of Earth Sciences, which funded the research. "SLO's are indicative of high-energy cosmic airbursts/impacts, bolstering the contention that these events induced the beginning of the Younger Dryas. That time was a major departure in biotic, human and climate history."

Morphological and geochemical evidence of the melt-glass confirms that the material is not cosmic, volcanic, or of human-made origin. "The very high temperature melt-glass appears identical to that produced in known cosmic impact events such as Meteor Crater in Arizona, and the Australasian tektite field," said Kennett.
"The melt material also matches melt-glass produced by the Trinity nuclear airburst of 1945 in Socorro, New Mexico," he continued. "The extreme temperatures required are equal to those of an atomic bomb blast, high enough to make sand melt and boil."

To me this is fairly significant given the time frame of both the Younger Drays itself ( a sudden deep freeze that dropped temperatures 15 C at higher latitudes and evidence of a mean annual of 5 C in the UK, thought to have occurred between roughly 12,800 and 11,500 years BP and lasted for roughly 1200 years ) and the period of it's onset and decline. If that period was much shorter than thought, say a week instead of a decade, that would be one heck of a ride in terms of changes in global weather and geological conditions.

The outside number of that date roughly coincides with carbon dating found at Gobekli Tepe.

Before this new evidence ( presuming it withstands scrutiny ) I thought it was still a pretty nasty turn of events here on Earth even if it only took a decade to fall into a thousand year freeze, we're pretty tough creatures.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on July 01, 2012, 07:18:15 PM
So it appears that they have found the Higgs Boson particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on July 03, 2012, 03:49:54 AM
So it appears that they have found the Higgs Boson particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

Yet Burke can't find a #1 goalie LOL AMIRITE
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 03, 2012, 08:14:35 AM
So it appears that they have found the Higgs Boson particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

That's just bananas. Discovering this particle is one of the main reasons the collider was built in the first place, what a huge moment.

The official announcement is tomorrow morning.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 03, 2012, 08:36:09 AM
Leonard Susskind explains the universe as hologram ( the 'holographic principle' ) (http://ww3.tvo.org/video/167533/leonard-susskind-world-hologram)

Susskind is a pioneer in string theory and is known for winning the 'Black Hole' wars against chief rival Stephen Hawking. An interesting notion at the heart of the discussion relates to the oddity of the states of a black hole being proportional to the area of the event horizon, not the volume of the interior.

The holographic principle suggests this is true for all matter.

Susskind presents the idea using very basic drawings to illustrate the concept, it's pretty easy to follow but the conclusion is a bit mind bendy. Voxels are your friend...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on July 03, 2012, 08:42:56 AM
So, in layman's terms, this particle is (or can be) the blueprint? 
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 03, 2012, 10:57:44 AM
So, in layman's terms, this particle is (or can be) the blueprint?

The term 'God Particle' is the genuine laymen term for it. I don't know about 'blueprint', that suggests some kind of organization which is an unknown ( actually it's noted as 'spontaneous symmetry breaking' ), what it's been proposed to do ( as it's only existed in math before ) is to give elementary particles like electrons mass or is a byproduct of the process.

The Higgs field is proposed to exist in all of space and give rise to everything in space in terms of mass, the Higgs boson ( a boson is one of the two essential classes of particles in physics, the other being fermions ) is created when the Higgs field becomes excited.

In the standard model, the Higgs boson was the last particle to be observed. If they get more than a footprint it goes a long way to validating that theory and focuses a new understanding of how and why we have mass to begin with.

I like the old school 'ether' myself... ;)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on July 03, 2012, 11:34:17 AM
Thanks... I think  :o
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 03, 2012, 01:32:16 PM
Thanks... I think  :o

:) Put it another way, without it nothing as we know it would exist, at least in the way we describe it on paper. Without the Hb particles would never gain mass, never form atoms and without atoms there's no you, no me etc., according to the theory at least, it had to be there or someone was getting a 10 billion dollar drawing board.

But of course everything does exist so really they're tightening up their theories and knocking down another wall towards understanding how things work, a fundamental one if this really is proof of how particles with mass suddenly come into existence. Apparently the group at cern is pretty confident with their results, I guess we'll know more tomorrow.

For some reason I'm reminded of Bill Hicks.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on July 03, 2012, 02:10:21 PM
Pretty hardcore creationalist talking my ear off on this since this morning... My head is spinning.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on July 05, 2012, 03:03:29 AM
Thanks... I think  :o

:) Put it another way, without it nothing as we know it would exist, at least in the way we describe it on paper. Without the Hb particles would never gain mass, never form atoms and without atoms there's no you, no me etc., according to the theory at least, it had to be there or someone was getting a 10 billion dollar drawing board.

But of course everything does exist so really they're tightening up their theories and knocking down another wall towards understanding how things work, a fundamental one if this really is proof of how particles with mass suddenly come into existence. Apparently the group at cern is pretty confident with their results, I guess we'll know more tomorrow.

For some reason I'm reminded of Bill Hicks.


Personally speaking, I always believed that there is an intelligence out there responsible for the very essence of creation.  God does not sport a beard, but rather, as this recent research points to, one can also say that existence is part of the psychic realm of the universe, looking at it from a religious scope.

We are all made of molecular energy.  The theory of quantum physics, tachionic faster than light.

Everything is made of energy.  What is fascinating is how all this energy came into being, the how more than the why.  The research being done sheds new light on the mysteries of our existence, our universe, even our religious viewpoint on the issue of the commencement of creation in terms of everything else.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 07, 2012, 06:58:26 PM
To that end Strassman's work with DMT comes to mind, I don't doubt there's a higher order, personally I think humans are a little too distracted to really embrace it/perceive it right now, generally.

Build us a quantum computer then... (http://www.thebunsenburner.com/news/unprecedented-discovery-could-propel-quantum-computers-to-reality/)

Quote
Using a pair of impurities in ultra-pure, laboratory-grown diamonds, the researchers announced earlier this week that preliminary results reveal the ability to create quantum bits and store information in them for nearly two seconds — an increase of nearly six magnitudes, say the scientists. The work, described in the June 8 issue of Science, is a critical first step in the eventual construction of a functional quantum computer that could one day allow for advanced computations.

“What we’ve been able to achieve in terms of control is quite unprecedented,” Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin said. “We have a qubit, at room temperature, that we can measure with very high efficiency and fidelity. We can encode data in it, and we can store it for a relatively long time. We believe this work is limited only by technical issues, so it looks feasible to increase the life span into the range of hours. At that point, a host of real-world applications become possible.”

The research is the latest step towards creating quantum computers. A  practical quantum computer with enough qubits available could complete in minutes calculations that would take ultrafast super-computers years, and your laptop perhaps millions of years to process. Such computers will harness the powers of atoms and sub-atomic particles (ions, photons, electrons) to perform memory and processing tasks, thanks to the strange sub-atomic properties of quantum mechanics, say scientists.

...

The most current computers are possibly able to understand is a bit. Much like a light that can be switched on or off, a bit can have only one of two values: “1″ or “0″. For qubits, they can hold a value of “1” or “0” as well as both values at the same time. Described as superposition, this is what allows quantum computers to perform millions of calculations at once.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 07, 2012, 07:51:22 PM
Speed of light corner cameras... (http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18636266)

Quote
"Initially I was obsessed with the camera seeing around corners and then I realised that we could use the data for pure visualisations," he told the BBC.

He has discussed the idea with scientists from around the world, including those at Cern - the base for the Large Hadron Collider.

"They have various ultra-fast events at the sub-atomic level which this has potential to help with," he said.

Other possible uses for the femto-camera include health imaging to offers views from inside the body without using x-rays.

I'm not quite sure how to emote Dr. McCoy's diagnosis gadget, some kind of whistling sound...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 09, 2012, 04:05:53 PM
Oh boy... (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/may/20/craig-venter-synthetic-life-form)

Quote
Scientists have created the world's first synthetic life form in a landmark experiment that paves the way for designer organisms that are built rather than evolved.

The controversial feat, which has occupied 20 scientists for more than 10 years at an estimated cost of $40m, was described by one researcher as "a defining moment in biology".

Craig Venter, the pioneering US geneticist behind the experiment, said the achievement heralds the dawn of a new era in which new life is made to benefit humanity, starting with bacteria that churn out biofuels, soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and even manufacture vaccines.

However critics, including some religious groups, condemned the work, with one organisation warning that artificial organisms could escape into the wild and cause environmental havoc or be turned into biological weapons. Others said Venter was playing God.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on July 09, 2012, 04:11:19 PM
Oh boy... (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/may/20/craig-venter-synthetic-life-form)

Quote
Scientists have created the world's first synthetic life form in a landmark experiment that paves the way for designer organisms that are built rather than evolved.

The controversial feat, which has occupied 20 scientists for more than 10 years at an estimated cost of $40m, was described by one researcher as "a defining moment in biology".

Craig Venter, the pioneering US geneticist behind the experiment, said the achievement heralds the dawn of a new era in which new life is made to benefit humanity, starting with bacteria that churn out biofuels, soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and even manufacture vaccines.

However critics, including some religious groups, condemned the work, with one organisation warning that artificial organisms could escape into the wild and cause environmental havoc or be turned into biological weapons. Others said Venter was playing God.

I don't buy the playing God nonsense one bit, but I do agree that we don't know how to control them. Until we have a method for complete control ideas such as these won't work. I don't think there's really any difference in the ethics behind this.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 09, 2012, 04:17:40 PM
Yeah, I buy the 'we don't have a clue how this will impact an ecosystem and we're afraid of that' more than playing god, unless god's a degenerate gambler or something... ;)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on July 09, 2012, 04:52:22 PM
Yeah, I buy the 'we don't have a clue how this will impact an ecosystem and we're afraid of that' more than playing god, unless god's a degenerate gambler or something... ;)

Haha, it reminds me of an old George Carlin bit. It's not like "God" has a great batting average anyway, look at us!  ;D
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 09, 2012, 04:59:46 PM
shifting holes in the magnetosphere (http://gizmodo.com/5923149/scientist-finds-hidden-portals-in-earths-magnetic-field)

Quote
According to NASA, Jack Scudder—a researcher at the University of Iowa—has found "hidden portals on Earth's magnetic field [that] open and close dozens of times each day." Some of them are open for long periods of time.
Scudder says that these portals "create an uninterrupted path leading from our own planet to the sun's atmosphere 93 million miles away."

Called X-points or electron diffusion regions, they are located "a few tens of thousands of kilometers from Earth. The portals are created through a process of magnetic reconnection in which lines of magnetic force from both celestial bodies mingle and criss-cross through space. The criss-crossing creates these x-points.

The portals are "invisible, unstable and elusive," opening and closing without any warning. When they open, however, they are capable of transporting energetic particles at high speed from the Sun's atmosphere's to Earth's, causing geomagnetic storms.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on July 18, 2012, 06:02:14 AM
John Anthony West was on the Joe Rogan Podcast on June the 9th, very interesting.

I know you'll probably enjoy it Tigger.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on July 18, 2012, 09:27:34 AM
I'll never even remotely understand the science behind subatomic particles but I remain deeply fascinated by the theology behind the God particle. I gave this a listen last night... Thought it was pretty good;

Higgs Boson & Ancient Texts/ Inverted Spirituality
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2012/07/16
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 18, 2012, 10:50:38 AM
John Anthony West was on the Joe Rogan Podcast on June the 9th, very interesting.

I know you'll probably enjoy it Tigger.

It was very enjoyable, West is quite blunt and thoughtful... 'plenty of vodka in the freezer'... :)

Funny, I had just re watched a chunk of his 'Magical Egypt' shows ( I think you can see all eight of them on the youtube ) again marveling at the temple of Luxor and other wonders when a buddy sent a link to the Rogan show you're talking about ( also on the youtube ).

Thanks Wigwal!

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 09:06:45 AM
I'll never even remotely understand the science behind subatomic particles but I remain deeply fascinated by the theology behind the God particle. I gave this a listen last night... Thought it was pretty good;

Higgs Boson & Ancient Texts/ Inverted Spirituality
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2012/07/16

Some of that was interesting Sarge, and though I'm a fan of keeping the science separate from religion for the most part, I also acknowledge that some of the greatest thinkers were/are deeply religious people so I'm not against it.

Bohm's extrapolation is something that, in a way, is near and dear to my heart. Humans linear existence, snapshots from second to second, almost deny the notion of a greater whole simply 'existing', without time as we perceive it. It's fascinating and frightening.

However, Bohm's discussion of quantum entanglement is not a new thought by any stretch, Einstein, in a famous battle with Niels Bohr over quantum mechanics, described it as 'spooky action at a distance' in 1935. Funny, Bohr ended up winning that argument in the opinion of the the scientific world but Einstein had actually worked out the trump card for that in 1930 in a thought experiment with the Heisenburg uncertainty principle ( the gist being that you cannot measure both energy and time with a high level of accuracy ), though he didn't recognize it.

Interestingly, Bohr is a central figure in the bizarre set of circumstances that led to the discovery and understanding of nuclear fission. In the biography 'Geons, Black Holes and Quantum Foam... A Lifetime in Physics' by John Archibald Wheeler, the connected dots cross the ocean and it was Lise Meitner's inspiration during a conversation with her nephew Otto Frisch during a winter sojourn that led to the discovery and initiated the baby steps towards the creation of the first atomic weapon...

From Chapter One (http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/w/wheeler-geons.html)

Quote
"Bohr learned of fission on January 7, just as he and his son Erik were about to board the train in Copenhagen for Gothenburg, the MS Drottningholm's embarkation point. Otto Frisch, a German emigre physicist working at Bohr's University Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen, sought out Bohr to inform him of the postulate of fission that he (Frisch) and his aunt, Lise Meitner, had devised in the last week of December to explain puzzling results found by the German chemists Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in their Berlin laboratory. When Hahn and Strassmann bombarded uranium with neutrons (subnuclear particles with no electric charge), they found evidence that the element barium was created. Since barium is far removed from uranium in the periodic table and has a much lighter nucleus, they could not make sense of this result. Hahn wrote to Meitner in Sweden, describing the puzzle, for she had been his longtime colleague in Berlin before leaving Germany to escape persecution, and was trained in physics. When her nephew Frisch came for a holiday visit, they took a Christmas Eve walk in the woods--he on skis and she on foot--to ponder the Berlin results. Suddenly it became clear to them. The uranium nucleus must be breaking into large fragments, resulting in the nuclei of other elements, including sometimes the nucleus of barium."

Anywho, I linked a note about quantum computers previously, the notion for their development comes directly from this idea. Entangled particles can communicate seemingly faster than light, a particle can seem to exist in two places at once. An actual application of a very, very odd field in physics, one that will revolutionize computing and make the world even scarier.

At this point I don't put any stock in the notion of theology behind the Higgs Boson, the discovery, if verified, just provides a clearer understanding of how particles with mass come into existence. Pretending that we know anything about why it happens, as if 'purpose' can be attributed from what we can perceive, is a guessing game at best.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on July 25, 2012, 09:18:26 AM
Thanks for sharing... I'm not sold one way or another either but this whole "something from nothing" idea and how it applies to the universe and our existence is something that I'd be interested in doing more reading on. I find it all really fascinating and at the very least, perhaps further research into it will get me more up to speed on the science which as I said, I'm woefully ignorant of at this point.       
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 09:45:27 AM
It is fascinating and I applaud any attempt at learning more about it.

An aside, I also find it fascinating that the iron in our blood likely contributed to the death of a star...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 10:10:24 AM
300,000 year old flint tools found in northern France (http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2012/300-000-year-old-flint-tools-found-in-northern-france)

Quote
The deposits at Etricourt Manancourt in the Picardie region of France documents the history of early European settlements, revealing at least five prehistoric levels, ranging between 300,000 and 80,000 years old.

...

Seven metres deep, the excavation revealed three major climatic cycles through successive glacial and interglacial periods (the Holsteinian the Saalian and Weichselian).
The contents of the 300,000 year layer are perfectly preserved in moist soil conditions and has produced so far several hundred flints including the biface.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 10:34:17 AM
Iron Age 'Sacrifice' Is Britain's Oldest Surviving Brain (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081212081722.htm?goback=%2Egde_690807_member_133617446)

Quote
The oldest surviving human brain in Britain, dating back at least 2000 years to the Iron Age, has been unearthed during excavations on the site of the University of York's campus expansion at Heslington East.

...

York Hospital's sophisticated CT scanner was used to produce startlingly clear images of the skull's contents. Philip Duffey, Consultant Neurologist at the Hospital said: 'I'm amazed and excited that scanning has shown structures which appear to be unequivocally of brain origin. I think that it will be very important to establish how these structures have survived, whether there are traces of biological material within them and, if not, what is their composition.'

Dr Sonia O'Connor, Research Fellow in Archaeological Sciences at the University of Bradford added: 'The survival of brain remains where no other soft tissues are preserved is extremely rare. This brain is particularly exciting because it is very well preserved, even though it is the oldest recorded find of this type in the UK, and one of the earliest worldwide.'
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 10:45:33 AM
If You Are Hit By Two Atomic Bombs, Should You Have Kids? (http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/07/17/156915881/if-you-are-hit-by-two-atomic-bombs-should-you-have-kids)

Quote
Tsutomu Yamaguchi was late for work. It was August 1945, and he'd just finished designing a 5,000-ton tanker for his company, Mitsubishi. He was heading to the office to finish up, clear out and head home, and that's when he saw the plane, high up in the sky over Hiroshima. He watched it drop a silvery speck into the air, and instinctively, says science writer Sam Kean, "he dove to the ground and covered his eyes and plugged his ears with his thumbs."

...

So with nowhere to go and desperate to get away from the destruction and the burned bodies, he heard a rumor the railroad might still be working. He decided to head for the train station, which was across a river. The bridges were down. He tried crawling across a logjam of corpses, but couldn't cross, then found a single railroad beam and made it to the other side, where, amazingly, trains were indeed leaving for other cities. He pushed himself onto one heading southwest to his hometown...Nagasaki.

...

In his new book, The Violinist's Thumb, Sam Kean (a Radiolab regular), describes what happened next. In the short run, DNA damage creates radiation sickness, (headaches, vomiting, internal bleeding, peeling skin, anemic blood) and all that happened to Mr. Yamaguchi. He found his wife and 2-year-old son, rested for a day (or rather, went in and out of consciousness), and then, on Aug. 9, he headed to Mitsubishi offices in Nagasaki to hand in his assignment. When he arrived, he told his boss about the strange new bomb that had evaporated parts of Hiroshima, but the boss, writes Sam, didn't believe him.

"You're an engineer," he barked. "Calculate it. How could one bomb...destroy a whole city?" Famous last words. [At that moment] a white light swelled inside the room. Heat prickled Yamaguchi's skin, and he hit the deck of the ship engineering office. "I thought," he later recalled, "the mushroom cloud followed me from Hiroshima."

What are the sheer odds of surviving those two horrible events? Yamaguchi died at age 93 of stomach cancer, his wife ( who survived the Nagasaki bombing ) at age 88 of kidney and liver cancer, their children, according to the article, show no signs of lasting DNA damage.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 25, 2012, 11:41:03 AM
An interesting footnote to Lise Meitner's influence on the atomic age, she was contacted by Leo Szilard prior to the experimentation with uranium that led her and her nephew to the first true notion of atomic energy, something that likely stuck with her. ( today we don't think of a woman in this role as being anything special, when she was born there were no women in her field )

In fact, Leo had the idea around 1933 in stark reaction to popular musings from the scientific world, though he didn't have any idea what element would be the culprit, he grasped that neutrons were the key to creating a chain reaction and a subsequent energy output ( the first to realize this ) and openly disagreed with 'Lord' Earnest Rutherford who said that the idea of creating energy from the transmutation of elements was a dubious idea.

Szilard would have been the pioneer everyone remembers if he had access to the experiments that Meitner did, I have no doubt, instead he's remembered more for his forward thinking of the Nazi regime as early as 1931.

"Many...people took a very optimistic view of the situation. They all thought that civilized Germans would not stand for anything really rough happening. The reason that I took the opposite position was... [because] I noticed that Germans always took a utilitarian point of view.

They asked,“Well, suppose I would oppose this thinking, what good would I do?...I would just lose my influence.”...You see, the moral point of view was completely absent, or very weak....And on that basis I reached in 1931 the conclusion that Hitler would get into power, not because the forces of the Nazi revolution were so strong, but rather because I thought that there would be no resistance whatsoever"
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on July 26, 2012, 02:52:34 AM
If You Are Hit By Two Atomic Bombs, Should You Have Kids? (http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/07/17/156915881/if-you-are-hit-by-two-atomic-bombs-should-you-have-kids)

Quote
Tsutomu Yamaguchi was late for work. It was August 1945, and he'd just finished designing a 5,000-ton tanker for his company, Mitsubishi. He was heading to the office to finish up, clear out and head home, and that's when he saw the plane, high up in the sky over Hiroshima. He watched it drop a silvery speck into the air, and instinctively, says science writer Sam Kean, "he dove to the ground and covered his eyes and plugged his ears with his thumbs."

...

So with nowhere to go and desperate to get away from the destruction and the burned bodies, he heard a rumor the railroad might still be working. He decided to head for the train station, which was across a river. The bridges were down. He tried crawling across a logjam of corpses, but couldn't cross, then found a single railroad beam and made it to the other side, where, amazingly, trains were indeed leaving for other cities. He pushed himself onto one heading southwest to his hometown...Nagasaki.

...

In his new book, The Violinist's Thumb, Sam Kean (a Radiolab regular), describes what happened next. In the short run, DNA damage creates radiation sickness, (headaches, vomiting, internal bleeding, peeling skin, anemic blood) and all that happened to Mr. Yamaguchi. He found his wife and 2-year-old son, rested for a day (or rather, went in and out of consciousness), and then, on Aug. 9, he headed to Mitsubishi offices in Nagasaki to hand in his assignment. When he arrived, he told his boss about the strange new bomb that had evaporated parts of Hiroshima, but the boss, writes Sam, didn't believe him.

"You're an engineer," he barked. "Calculate it. How could one bomb...destroy a whole city?" Famous last words. [At that moment] a white light swelled inside the room. Heat prickled Yamaguchi's skin, and he hit the deck of the ship engineering office. "I thought," he later recalled, "the mushroom cloud followed me from Hiroshima."

What are the sheer odds of surviving those two horrible events? Yamaguchi died at age 93 of stomach cancer, his wife ( who survived the Nagasaki bombing ) at age 88 of kidney and liver cancer, their children, according to the article, show no signs of lasting DNA damage.


An absolutely fascinating read.  The fact that Mr. Yamaguchi lived long enough (before succumbing to cancer), and that his children showed no DNA damage is incredible. 

DNA, it seems, has an extraordinary talent for mending itself...

That alone, is self-explanatory.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on July 29, 2012, 12:12:38 PM
Pretty depressing the reality of it.

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/climate-results-turn-sceptic-let-the-evidence-change-our-minds-20120730-23769.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 31, 2012, 08:02:19 AM
It is a bit depressing. The planet's human population has increased by about 6 billion in the last 200 years and we're party animals, looking at 10 billion by the end of this century.

Nothing a couple chunks of comet couldn't help slow down, like my previous post about the Younger Dryas boundary hypothesis.

Anywho, this was interesting...

Plastic-Eating Underwater Drone Could Swallow the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-07/plastic-eating-underwater-drone-could-swallow-great-pacific-garbage-patch)

Quote
A new underwater drone concept could seek and destroy one of the ocean’s most insidious enemies, while earning a profit for plastics recyclers. This marine drone can siphon plastic garbage, swallowing bits of trash in a gaping maw rivaling that of a whale shark.

Industrial design student Elie Ahovi, who previously brought us the Orbit clothes washer concept, now presents the Marine Drone, an autonomous electric vehicle that tows a plastic-trapping net. The net is surrounded by a circular buoy to balance the weight of the garbage it collects. It discourages fish and other creatures from entering its jaws via an annoying sonic transmitter, and it communicates with other drones and with its base station using sonar.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: sucka on July 31, 2012, 12:32:29 PM
I don't think the population will ever get that high.  I mean, about a 1/3 of the world's pop is in India and China.  Most places everywhere is seeing natural population increase slowing or even declining.  I don't think you can extrapolate historical growth in the 2 most populous countries, China and India, due to the 1 child policy and improving economic conditions.  GDP doesn't mean squat if you've got billions of people to feed.  I think these two countries view their large populations as burdens, (moreso in China) and will see decreases in the decades to come.  I think it'll hit a peak of 8-9 billion with a top heavy elderly mix and then rapidly settle much lower.  That would be a nice scenario environmentally.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on July 31, 2012, 02:29:18 PM
I think it's a good bet that it'll get close to 10 billion, and though things could change over the next 88 years to help to curb those numbers, it seems less likely to me.

Looking at page 5 of chapter one of 'The State of World Population 2011' (http://foweb.unfpa.org/SWP2011/reports/EN-SWOP2011-FINAL.pdf) from the United Nations there's a graph that suggests roughly 9.8 billion.

However, when you say 'that would be a nice scenario environmentally', I would only agree if somehow everyone in North America, Europe, Japan and Australia suddenly decided to live a lot more like the Amish then they do. Those 4 represent roughly 20% of the world's population while using 80% of it's resources. That is unsustainable.

Additionally, in places that use less currently, demand causing impact to the environment is increasing... and it takes a lot less per person on that side of the ledger to have a profound impact.

Right now it takes 1.5 years to balance the carbon budget for each year of consumption and that's been going on since 1980 and showing no signs of slowing down.

None of that even touches how we're affecting the Earth in terms of waste products.

I mean, when I say over population is a problem it is but it goes hand in hand with levels of consumption, waste and types of energy usage.

Sure, 8 billion Mennonites would probably be fine.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on August 01, 2012, 04:32:27 PM
Gorilla Youngsters Seen Dismantling Poachers' Traps—A First (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/07/120719-young-gorillas-juvenile-traps-snares-rwanda-science-fossey/)

Quote
Just days after a poacher's snare had killed one of their own, two young mountain gorillas worked together Tuesday to find and destroy traps in their Rwandan forest home, according to conservationists on the scene.

"This is absolutely the first time that we've seen juveniles doing that ... I don't know of any other reports in the world of juveniles destroying snares," said Veronica Vecellio, gorilla program coordinator at the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund's Karisoke Research Center, located in the reserve where the event took place.

...

On Tuesday tracker John Ndayambaje spotted a trap very close to the Kuryama gorilla clan. He moved in to deactivate the snare, but a silverback named Vubu grunted, cautioning Ndayambaje to stay away, Vecellio said.

Suddenly two juveniles—Rwema, a male; and Dukore, a female; both about four years old—ran toward the trap.

As Ndayambaje and a few tourists watched, Rwema jumped on the bent tree branch and broke it, while Dukore freed the noose.

The pair then spied another snare nearby—one the tracker himself had missed—and raced for it. Joined by a third gorilla, a teenager named Tetero, Rwema and Dukore destroyed that trap as well.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on August 01, 2012, 08:52:57 PM
Wow, did they have green eyes?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on August 01, 2012, 09:24:45 PM
 :)

I hope so... interesting that they started destroying the traps after a baby died and that it seemed from the anecdote that two 4 year old gorillas were being directed by a silverback.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on August 06, 2012, 01:17:10 AM
Watching this Mars landing stuff - really neat.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/08/120805-nasa-tv-mars-landing-rover-curiosity-science-how-watch-see/?source=link_tw20120806news-marsroverlanding&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_tw20120806news-marsroverlanding&utm_campaign=Content
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Green Leaf on August 06, 2012, 07:03:15 AM
why is he not talking??

EDIT: and is that the seven minutes of terror?  ???
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 06, 2012, 10:41:53 AM
Canadian-made X-ray Spectrometre is on being used on the rover.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on August 22, 2012, 11:12:11 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19168047

Quote
Researchers from Israel say that mysterious clay and stone artefacts from Neolithic times could be the earliest known "matches".

Although the cylindrical objects have been known about for some time, they had previously been interpreted as "cultic" phallic symbols.

The researchers' new interpretation means these could be the earliest evidence of how fires were ignited.

The journal reports that the artefacts are almost 8,000 years old.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 01, 2012, 02:48:17 PM
Scientists Invent Oxygen Particle That If Injected, Allows You To Live Without Breathing (http://www.techwench.com/scientists-invent-oxygen-particle-that-if-injected-allows-you-to-live-without-breathing/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews)

Quote
A team of scientists at the Boston Children’s Hospital have invented what is being considered one the greatest medical breakthroughs in recent years. They have designed a microparticle that can be injected into a person’s bloodstream that can quickly oxygenate their blood. This will even work if the ability to breathe has been restricted, or even cut off entirely.

This finding has the potential to save millions of lives every year. The microparticles can keep an object alive for up to 30 min after respiratory failure. This is accomplished through an injection into the patients’ veins. Once injected, the microparticles can oxygenate the blood to near normal levels. This has countless potential uses as it allows life to continue when oxygen is needed but unavailable. For medical personnel, this is just enough time to avoid risking a heart attack or permanent brain injury when oxygen is restricted or cut off to patients.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 05, 2012, 09:32:18 AM
Denisovan Genome Sequenced, Reveals Brown-Eyed Girl Of Extinct Human Species (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/31/denisovan-genome-sequence_n_1844932.html)

Quote
The genome of a recently discovered branch of extinct humans known as the Denisovans that once interbred with us has been sequenced, scientists said today (Aug. 30).

Genetic analysis of the fossil revealed it apparently belonged to a little girl with dark skin, brown hair and brown eyes, researchers said. All in all, the scientists discovered about 100,000 recent changes in our genome that occurred after the split from the Denisovans. A number of these changes influence genes linked with brain function and nervous system development, leading to speculation that we may think differently from the Denisovans. Other changes are linked with the skin, eyes and teeth.

"This research will help [in] determining how it was that modern human populations came to expand dramatically in size as well as cultural complexity, while archaic humans eventually dwindled in numbers and became physically extinct," said researcher Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

Future research may turn up other groups of extinct humans in Asia "in addition to Neanderthals and Denisovans," Pääbo told LiveScience.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on September 05, 2012, 04:11:08 PM
Scientists Invent Oxygen Particle That If Injected, Allows You To Live Without Breathing (http://www.techwench.com/scientists-invent-oxygen-particle-that-if-injected-allows-you-to-live-without-breathing/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews)

Quote
A team of scientists at the Boston Children’s Hospital have invented what is being considered one the greatest medical breakthroughs in recent years. They have designed a microparticle that can be injected into a person’s bloodstream that can quickly oxygenate their blood. This will even work if the ability to breathe has been restricted, or even cut off entirely.

This finding has the potential to save millions of lives every year. The microparticles can keep an object alive for up to 30 min after respiratory failure. This is accomplished through an injection into the patients’ veins. Once injected, the microparticles can oxygenate the blood to near normal levels. This has countless potential uses as it allows life to continue when oxygen is needed but unavailable. For medical personnel, this is just enough time to avoid risking a heart attack or permanent brain injury when oxygen is restricted or cut off to patients.

Wow, if true and with no side effects, that's pretty amazing!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 08, 2012, 09:15:57 AM
Wow, if true and with no side effects, that's pretty amazing!

From what I gather after reading quite a few reports the micro particles have demonstrated lowered incidence of organ damage in animals who were not able to breathe for 15 or more minutes. I haven't read the actual article from the developers yet as I don't subscribe to the magazine and I haven't found an alternative. I'm sure it needs testing but it seems legit.

The abstract is here (http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/140/140ra88).

A couple interesting bits in this (http://childrenshospital.org/newsroom/Site1339/mainpageS1339P892.html) article including who paid for the research.

Funny, I don't see any kind of 'branding' yet.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on September 08, 2012, 11:25:49 AM
It's a good, albeit new, journal.  It's really fantastic development for health care, military, and rescue operations.  What I'm not sure about is why there isn't more talk about the product for something that could really revolutionize a lot of medicine (as well as other fields).
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: moon111 on September 09, 2012, 10:29:34 AM
Maybe we can inject some micro particles in the Leafs, because I swear some of them go without oxygen to the brain for at least 30 minutes.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 09, 2012, 10:54:15 AM
Maybe we can inject some micro particles in the Leafs, because I swear some of them go without oxygen to the brain for at least 30 minutes.

 ;D
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 11, 2012, 11:59:39 AM
The newly launched UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage web portal (http://www2.astronomicalheritage.net/)... the Astronomical Heritage Finder (http://www2.astronomicalheritage.net/index.php/heritage/astronomical-heritage-finder) is pretty interesting...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 11, 2012, 12:16:56 PM
Carbohydrates found in space near a star for the first time... (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/08/120829-sugar-space-planets-science-life/)

Quote
The molecules that the team detected in space are the simplest form of sugar, called glycoaldehyde, explained lead astronomer Jes Jørgensen of Denmark's Copenhagen University.

Glycoaldehyde can be found on Earth, usually in the form of an odorless white powder. While it isn't used to sweeten foods, it is important because scientists think it plays a key role in the chemical reaction that forms ribonucleic acid (RNA), a crucial biomolecule present in all living cells.

...

"These results are giving us and other astronomers ammunition," Jørgensen said, "to go out and look for other prebiotic, and possibly more complex, molecules in regions where stars and planets are forming."
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 11, 2012, 12:20:40 PM
Water found shooting from both poles of proto star (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/06/110613-space-science-star-water-bullets-kristensen/)

Quote
Seven hundred and fifty light-years from Earth, a young, sunlike star has been found with jets that blast epic quantities of water into interstellar space, shooting out droplets that move faster than a speeding bullet.

The discovery suggests that protostars may be seeding the universe with water. These stellar embryos shoot jets of material from their north and south poles as their growth is fed by infalling dust that circles the bodies in vast disks.

"If we picture these jets as giant hoses and the water droplets as bullets, the amount shooting out equals a hundred million times the water flowing through the Amazon River every second," said Lars Kristensen, a postdoctoral astronomer at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

....

What's really exciting about the discovery is that it appears to be a stellar rite of passage, the researchers say, which may shed new light on the earliest stages of our own sun's life—and how water fits into that picture.

"We are only now beginning to understand that sunlike stars probably all undergo a very energetic phase when they are young," Kristensen said. "It's at this point in their lives when they spew out a lot of high-velocity material—part of which we now know is water."

Like a celestial sprinkler system, the star may be enriching the interstellar medium—thin gases that float in the voids between stars. And because the hydrogen and oxygen in water are key components of the dusty disks in which stars form, such protostar sprinklers may be encouraging the growth of further stars, the study says.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 11, 2012, 12:41:57 PM
Water found shooting from both poles of proto star (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/06/110613-space-science-star-water-bullets-kristensen/)

Quote
Seven hundred and fifty light-years from Earth, a young, sunlike star has been found with jets that blast epic quantities of water into interstellar space, shooting out droplets that move faster than a speeding bullet.

The discovery suggests that protostars may be seeding the universe with water. These stellar embryos shoot jets of material from their north and south poles as their growth is fed by infalling dust that circles the bodies in vast disks.

"If we picture these jets as giant hoses and the water droplets as bullets, the amount shooting out equals a hundred million times the water flowing through the Amazon River every second," said Lars Kristensen, a postdoctoral astronomer at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

....

What's really exciting about the discovery is that it appears to be a stellar rite of passage, the researchers say, which may shed new light on the earliest stages of our own sun's life—and how water fits into that picture.

"We are only now beginning to understand that sunlike stars probably all undergo a very energetic phase when they are young," Kristensen said. "It's at this point in their lives when they spew out a lot of high-velocity material—part of which we now know is water."

Like a celestial sprinkler system, the star may be enriching the interstellar medium—thin gases that float in the voids between stars. And because the hydrogen and oxygen in water are key components of the dusty disks in which stars form, such protostar sprinklers may be encouraging the growth of further stars, the study says.


That's incredible!  More so the intelligence of  'God', the natures, evolution itself.  Everything has it's purpose for whatever it was created for and by.  The Universe and our planetary system In general are sheer fascination.  Always have been, always will be.

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 11, 2012, 12:51:28 PM
More EEG fun, brain hacked for personal information using off the shelf device... Ivan Panovic ( University of Oxford ) audio presentation... ( On the Feasibility of Side-Channel Attacks with Brain-Computer Interfaces ) (https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity12/feasibility-side-channel-attacks-brain-computer-interfaces)

Quote
Brain computer interfaces (BCI) are becoming increasingly popular in the gaming and entertainment industries. Consumer-grade BCI devices are available for a few hundred dollars and are used in a variety of applications, such as video games, hands-free keyboards, or as an assistant in relaxation training. There are application stores similar to the ones used for smart phones, where application developers have access to an API to collect data from the BCI devices.

The security risks involved in using consumer-grade BCI devices have never been studied and the impact of malicious software with access to the device is unexplored. We take a first step in studying the security implications of such devices and demonstrate that this upcoming technology could be turned against users to reveal their private and secret information. We use inexpensive electroencephalography (EEG) based BCI devices to test the feasibility of simple, yet effective, attacks. The captured EEG signal could reveal the user’s private informa- tion about, e.g., bank cards, PIN numbers, area of living, the knowledge of the known persons. This is the first attempt to study the security implications of consumer-grade BCI devices. We show that the entropy of the private information is decreased on the average by approximately 15 % - 40 % compared to random guessing attacks.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 11, 2012, 01:21:53 PM
The six billion dollar woman... (http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-08/world-first-scientists-surgically-implant-bionic-eye-blind-patient)

Quote
We've been waiting on the prospect of a bionic eye for a while now; being able to surgically give sight to the sightless would be a medical breakthrough, and we're right on the cusp. Exhibit A: In a world first, scientists have successfully implanted a prototype bionic eye that has helped a woman see shapes.

Researchers from the government-funded consortium Bionic Vision Australia made the announcement in a statement yesterday; in it the implantee said she "didn't know what to expect, but all of a sudden, I could see a little flash--it was amazing." The team is hoping they can start to "build" shapes based on what she sees, eventually creating a bionic eye that works like its organic counterpart.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 12, 2012, 02:43:07 PM
Living cells found in a Siberian frozen wooly mammoth my yield potential to cloning a la "Jurassic Park"...

Scientists have discovered well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the "Jurassic Park" possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organizer said.

Russia's North-Eastern Federal University said Tuesday an international team of researchers had discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow some 100 metres underground during a summer expedition in the northeastern province of Yakutia.

Expedition chief Semyon Grigoryev said Korean scientists with the team had set a goal of finding living cells in the hope of cloning a mammoth.

"Only after thorough laboratory research it will be known whether these are living cells or not," he said, adding that would take until the end of the year at the earliest.

Scientists already have deciphered much of the genetic code of the woolly mammoth from balls of mammoth hair found frozen in the Siberian permafrost. Some believe it's possible to recreate the prehistoric animal if they find living cells in the permafrost.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/09/11/science-woolly-mammoth-fragments-siberia.html (http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/09/11/science-woolly-mammoth-fragments-siberia.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 12, 2012, 03:16:31 PM
Called the "Amazon of the North", and stretching 1.8 million square kilometers, the MacKenzie River Basin is one of the most important ecosystems that we have on this planet, not only for Canada but for the world...

The watershed is three times the size of France, stretching through B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories, yet it became evident over several days of meetings that it is the least studied and monitored in the world, said Dr. Henry Vaux, chairman of the Rosenberg International Forum on Water Policy, a California-based think-tank that organized the panel in Vancouver.

...the committee affirmed the global significance of the Mackenzie River basin, which has been described as a massive air conditioning system for the Earth.

At a time when climate change and global warming make daily headlines, there are "worrisome" trends in the basin, he said.

"The benefits that flow from that river basin accrue not just to Canadians and not just to North Americans but to people throughout the western hemisphere and around the globe," Vaux said Friday, at the conclusion of the meeting.

The basin includes the Peace and Liard rivers in northern British Columbia, the South Nahanni and Peel rivers in the Yukon, and the Hay and Athabasca rivers in Alberta, all of which feed the 1,800-kilometre Mackenzie River.

It covers a staggering 1.8 million square kilometres of land, and takes in Great Slave, Great Bear and Athabasca lakes. And it falls into six different government jurisdictions in Canada. Experts say the lack of an overall management plan poses the greatest risk.

The Mackenize basin has a direct impact on the formation of sea ice and fresh water flow into the Arctic Ocean. It is an international waypoint for migratory birds from around the globe, and it provides climate stability for the continent and likely beyond.

The basin that covers 20 per cent of Canada's land mass is also rich in natural resources that include pristine forests and vast deposits of oil, oil sands, natural gas and minerals. The potential for resource development is immense.

For the rest of the article, go to:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/09/10/science-amazon-of-the-north.html (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/09/10/science-amazon-of-the-north.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Gerald The Duck on September 12, 2012, 03:49:30 PM
Love this thread, fascinating stuff.

A cool site I came across recently is redOrbit: http://www.redorbit.com/ (http://www.redorbit.com/),
they are constantly updating with new stories and I find the site very well organized as well, check it out.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on September 20, 2012, 01:20:43 AM
http://richarddawkins.net/news_articles/2012/9/17/-staggering-arctic-ice-loss-smashes-melt-records#.UFqnIztcTiM
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: sucka on September 20, 2012, 10:03:48 AM
Love this thread, fascinating stuff.

A cool site I came across recently is redOrbit: http://www.redorbit.com/ (http://www.redorbit.com/),
they are constantly updating with new stories and I find the site very well organized as well, check it out.

that's an excellenct site.  It's where I browse each morning at my desk to enjoy my coffee.  Another site is Space.com although new scientific news is a little slower to come by, understandably.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hap_leaf on October 11, 2012, 02:16:10 PM
Diamond planet discovered:
http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/article00649.html (http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/article00649.html)

When space exploration leads to harvesting minerals that are attainable from meteors and other planets, how does this affect the value of our commodities on Earth?  And what country or corporation gets the rights to these raw materials?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on October 12, 2012, 08:27:08 AM
what country or corporation gets the rights to these raw materials?

Dibs!  8)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on November 20, 2012, 05:05:07 AM
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1kXCh496U0[/youtube]

Prairie dog language decoded, it seems they're able to communicate descriptions of potential predators accurately, ‘Here comes the tall human in the blue,’ or ‘Here comes the short human in the yellow’, interesting stuff as animal language has so far proven difficult to decipher.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on January 30, 2013, 07:44:32 AM
DNA imaged with electron microscope for the first time (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22545-dna-imaged-with-electron-microscope-for-the-first-time.html)

It's the most famous corkscrew in history. Now an electron microscope has captured the famous Watson-Crick double helix in all its glory, by imaging threads of DNA resting on a silicon bed of nails. The technique will let researchers see how proteins, RNA and other biomolecules interact with DNA.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on February 04, 2013, 10:11:26 AM
Anyone catch Neil Degrasse Tyson on the Rogan podcast?

It was a lot of fun, even his debunking of some of the cuckoo moon landing theories.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on February 15, 2013, 08:12:42 AM
Anyone catch Neil Degrasse Tyson on the Rogan podcast?

It was a lot of fun, even his debunking of some of the cuckoo moon landing theories.

Thanks Wigwal, I enjoyed every minute.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Green Leaf on February 15, 2013, 10:32:52 AM
I've been watching several videos regarding this throughout the morning. Quite shocking to watch.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on February 15, 2013, 10:37:21 AM
I've been watching several videos regarding this throughout the morning. Quite shocking to watch.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html)


Luckily it didn't happen over some part of Canada. 

Feel for those injured.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Green Leaf on February 15, 2013, 10:55:51 AM
Luckily it didn't happen over some part of Canada. 

Feel for those injured.

Myself aswell.. It is sad when there are casualities and losses due to something like this...

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on February 15, 2013, 12:00:37 PM
Sucks folks got hurt but I find it very cool. That said, that's about as big of a cosmic incident like that that I'd care to see.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: iwas11in67 on February 15, 2013, 02:19:52 PM
Maybe the mayans were off by a couple of months.  8)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Zee on February 15, 2013, 02:30:10 PM
2012 DA14 passed us by.  Nothing to see here.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on February 15, 2013, 02:53:19 PM
2012 DA14 passed us by.  Nothing to see here.

From Neil Degrasse Tyson's Twitter:

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BDHNZUdCAAIw8Ya.jpg:large)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on February 15, 2013, 03:28:35 PM
Anyone catch Neil Degrasse Tyson on the Rogan podcast?

It was a lot of fun, even his debunking of some of the cuckoo moon landing theories.

Thanks Wigwal, I enjoyed every minute.
Glad you enjoyed it Tig.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on February 15, 2013, 04:16:04 PM
I've been watching several videos regarding this throughout the morning. Quite shocking to watch.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html)

I'm not sure what videos are on the star page, but here's a mini-compilation of videos, showing different perspectives.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/02/15/meteorite-shower-russia/

Absolutely incredible.  I hope the injured are ok, but talk about WOW.  The amount of light that it gave off is insane.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: louisstamos on February 15, 2013, 05:06:45 PM
isn't this how Earthbound started?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Chett on February 15, 2013, 10:46:24 PM
I've been watching several videos regarding this throughout the morning. Quite shocking to watch.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/02/15/meteor_explodes_in_the_sky_above_russia_injuring_hundreds.html)

That's amazing footage, what a tiny, fragile planet we live on. Maybe Bryzgalov was right? Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Chett on February 15, 2013, 10:47:36 PM
isn't this how Earthbound started?

That was an awesome game. Remember how when your character was overmatched against certain enemies you wouldn't even have to fight, the battle would just automatically award you exp? That was cool.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: TheMightyOdin on February 16, 2013, 03:16:59 AM
Got to love Russians and their dashboard cams! Amazing footage of the meteorite.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Zee on February 16, 2013, 09:12:55 AM
Why do so many Russians have dashboard cams?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Sarge on February 16, 2013, 09:33:04 AM
Why do so many Russians have dashboard cams?

Apparently diving in front of cars (either for for insurance claims or lawsuits) is out of control over there. So, protection basically.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Andy on February 16, 2013, 09:35:38 AM
Why do so many Russians have dashboard cams?

Apparently diving in front of cars (either for for insurance claims or lawsuits) is out of control over there. So, protection basically.

Yes and actually they are called 'Kovalev Kams"
Title: Re: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Zee on February 16, 2013, 09:40:00 AM
Why do so many Russians have dashboard cams?

Apparently diving in front of cars (either for for insurance claims or lawsuits) is out of control over there. So, protection basically.

Wow.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on February 16, 2013, 09:51:22 AM
Why do so many Russians have dashboard cams?

It's their contribution to making internet videos more awesome.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on February 16, 2013, 12:07:01 PM
My son loves watching car crashes on YouTube.

I thank those crazy Russians for providing him with endless entertainment.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Dappleganger on February 16, 2013, 01:07:11 PM
My son loves watching car crashes on YouTube.

I thank those crazy Russians for providing him with endless entertainment.

I also love those videos. Thank god so many Russians install dash mounted cameras.

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on February 25, 2013, 07:09:42 AM
lnteresting research on evolution...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/02/22/science-evolution-diversification-doebeli.html?cmp=rss

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on February 25, 2013, 09:09:49 AM
Artificial ear from 3D printer... (http://www.futurity.org/top-stories/artificial-ear-from-3d-printer-looks-very-real/)

Quote
Replacement ears are usually constructed with materials that have a Styrofoam-like consistency, or sometimes, surgeons build ears from a patient’s harvested rib. This option is challenging and painful for children, and the ears rarely look completely natural or perform well.

To make the ears, Bonassar and colleagues started with a digitized 3D image of a human subject’s ear and converted the image into a digitized “solid” ear using a 3D printer to assemble a mold.

They injected the mold with collagen derived from rat tails, and then added 250 million cartilage cells from the ears of cows. The high-density gel has a consistency that is similar to Jell-O when the mold is removed. The collagen serves as a scaffold upon which cartilage can grow.

The process is also fast. “It takes half a day to design the mold, a day or so to print it, 30 minutes to inject the gel, and we can remove the ear 15 minutes later,” Bonassar says. “We trim the ear and then let it culture for several days in nourishing cell culture media before it is implanted.”

......

“Using human cells, specifically those from the same patient, would reduce any possibility of rejection,” Spector says. He adds that the best time to implant a bioengineered ear on a child would be when they are about 5 or 6 years old. At that age, ears are 80 percent of their adult size.

If all future safety and efficacy tests work out, it might be possible to try the first human implant in as little as three years.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on February 25, 2013, 09:34:10 AM
lnteresting research on evolution...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/02/22/science-evolution-diversification-doebeli.html?cmp=rss

Ray Kurzweil also states as much. He made a parallel of evolution to his law of accelerating returns.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on March 09, 2013, 05:34:53 AM
So far, disappointmerit...

Dark matter, the invisible stuff that makes up some 25 per cent of the universe, and super symmetry, a theory that says all particles have unseen extra-heavy counterparts, were top of the target list after the finding of the Higgs.

Both are integral parts of the concept of “New Physics” that should take knowledge of how the universe works beyond that of the Standard Model blueprint.

There is little or no controversy about dark matter, whose existence is deduced from its gravitational influence on the visible galaxies, stars and planets which make up little more than four per cent of the cosmos.

But super symmetry, dubbed SUSY by physicists, is controversial, championed by some physicists and dismissed as fantasy by others – like the string theory on how the universe is built, with which it is linked.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/science/higgs-god-particle-a-big-let-down-say-physicists/article9523149/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on March 12, 2013, 06:34:22 AM
Simply... w-o-w!!

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/mobileweb/2013/03/11/homemade-glider-captures-space-hd_n_2851338.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 06, 2013, 01:37:09 PM
So, Italy, what's up?

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/23/world/europe/italy-quake-scientists-guilty

Quote
Earthquake experts worldwide expressed shock at the manslaughter convictions of six Italian scientists who failed to predict the deadly L'Aquila quake, warning that the decision could severely harm future research.

Two scientists resigned their posts with the government's disaster preparedness agency Tuesday after a court in L'Aquila sentenced six scientists and a government official to six years in prison. The court ruled Monday that the scientists failed to accurately communicate the risk of the 2009 quake, which killed more than 300 people.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on April 06, 2013, 01:43:17 PM
So, Italy, what's up?

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/23/world/europe/italy-quake-scientists-guilty

Quote
Earthquake experts worldwide expressed shock at the manslaughter convictions of six Italian scientists who failed to predict the deadly L'Aquila quake, warning that the decision could severely harm future research.

Two scientists resigned their posts with the government's disaster preparedness agency Tuesday after a court in L'Aquila sentenced six scientists and a government official to six years in prison. The court ruled Monday that the scientists failed to accurately communicate the risk of the 2009 quake, which killed more than 300 people.

Italy's courts on science convictions are embarrassing.   They also awarded financial comepnsation on the basis of the MMR vaccine and autism.  A large piece of the ruling consisted of Andrew Wakefield's paper from the 90's that was complete fabrication.  A very disturbing trend.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/italian-court-reignites-mmr-vaccine-debate-after-award-over-child-with-autism-7858596.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/italian-court-reignites-mmr-vaccine-debate-after-award-over-child-with-autism-7858596.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 06, 2013, 01:52:27 PM
So maybe not travel there and definitely don't practice there, if I have the lesson right.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on April 06, 2013, 02:21:57 PM
Continue to eat the delicious food.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 06, 2013, 06:04:37 PM
Italy's courts on science convictions are embarrassing.   They also awarded financial comepnsation on the basis of the MMR vaccine and autism.  A large piece of the ruling consisted of Andrew Wakefield's paper from the 90's that was complete fabrication.  A very disturbing trend.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/italian-court-reignites-mmr-vaccine-debate-after-award-over-child-with-autism-7858596.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/italian-court-reignites-mmr-vaccine-debate-after-award-over-child-with-autism-7858596.html)



Valentino Bocca was 15 months old when he received an MMR jab in 2004. His parents said the change in him, after the jab, from a healthy boy to one who was in serious discomfort, was immediate.

People have a right to be concerned, especially in certain cases such as the boy mentioned above.  Perhaps it doesn't apply to every child nor to the majority, but it can apply to some especially when something happens like that it cannot be termed "coincidental".
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 07, 2013, 03:31:37 AM
(http://i939.photobucket.com/albums/ad239/fotogalri/image_zps02aae9e7.jpeg)

Astronomers watching a distant galaxy were stunned to see a black hole wake up like a hibernating bear, look around for a snack, then swallow a giant planetary structure that happened to venture too close.The phenomenon was spotted in NGC 4845, a galaxy located 47 million light-years from Earth, by the European Space Agency's INTEGRAL space observatory.

Astronomers from NASA then confirmed the discovery with the Swift space telescope, as did Japan using its MAXI X-ray monitor aboard the International Space Station.

It marks the first time astronomers have watched a black hole devour a sub-stellar object.

More here:
http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/astronomers-watch-as-distant-black-hole-roars-to-life-devours-planetary-structure-1.1225606
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 30, 2013, 01:51:11 PM
The Hubble telescope captures what is being dubbed as "the comet of the century":

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/04/29/tech-hubble-comet-ison.html

(http://i939.photobucket.com/albums/ad239/fotogalri/li-comet-ison-rtxyx4r_zpsad49f548.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 17, 2013, 04:54:10 AM
Attention all mathematicians!  Forgot the birds, think of the bees!

Seems as though a mathematical way solved the age-old mystery of how and why bees choose to make their honeycomb hexagon-shaped.  Maybe the bees are mathematicians, too!

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2013/05/13/183704091/what-is-it-about-bees-and-hexagons
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on June 11, 2013, 05:09:40 AM
What is killing our Killer Whales?  Could climate change be the culprit?

Many things, in fact...

The necropsies have shown that the orcas absorb extremely high loads of man-made toxins, suffer from infectious diseases and, in the case of fish-eating populations, depend primarily on severely depleted salmon stocks.

The necropsy list has increased data collection. Over the last two decades, an average of 10 killer whales a year have been discovered stranded across the entire North Pacific Ocean, and necropsies have jumped from about one in 50 to one in three.

“Because killer whales are apex predators and flagship conservation species, strandings are sad events,” he said. “But this study confirms that if we make every effort to understand why the strandings occurred, we will ultimately improve the fate of the species.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/study-of-killer-whale-deaths-reveals-more-about-their-lives/article12467641/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on June 14, 2013, 04:34:41 AM
Solar storms, solar tornadoes...NASA warns of potential calamitous weather patterns for Earth....

http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/06/13/nasa-chief-warns-of-solar-tornado-season-as-storms-dance-across-the-sun/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on June 30, 2013, 02:33:16 PM
Magic trick? No.  It's centripetal force at work here.  Watch how the looped metal beads (also called "Newton's beads") defy gravity...

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/beads-darndest-things-video-215944806.html (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/beads-darndest-things-video-215944806.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 04, 2013, 01:32:52 PM
Just when you thought otherwise...what's really polluting our Great Lakes...

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/geekquinox/great-lakes-polluted-facial-scrub-microbeads-135239606.html...

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on August 04, 2013, 02:02:22 PM
Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

Good to see the companies are going to make changes to their products.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on August 05, 2013, 12:20:13 PM
New data from Greenland ice cores suggest North America may have suffered a large cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23536567)

Quote
The climate flip has previously been linked to the demise of the North American "Clovis" people.

The data seem to back the idea that an impact tipped the climate into a colder phase, a point of current debate.

Rapid climate change occurred 12,900 years ago, and it is proposed that this is associated with the extinction of large mammals - such as the mammoth, widespread wildfires and rapid changes in atmospheric and ocean circulation.

...

A 100-fold spike in platinum concentration occurs in ice that is around 12,890 years old, at the same moment that rapid cooling of the climate is indicated from oxygen isotope measurements. This coincides with the start of a climatic period called the "Younger Dryas".

The Younger Dryas started and finished abruptly, and is one of a number of shorter periods of climate change that appear to have occurred since the last glacial maximum of 20,000 years ago.

Each end of the Younger Dryas period may have involved very rapid changes in temperature as the climate system reached a tipping point, with suggestions that dramatic changes in temperature occurred over as short as timescale as a decade or so.

I've posted previously about the Younger Dryas Boundary Theory, this is another bullet in that gun.

An aside, having seen the recent Chelyabinsk air burst, maybe they never will be able to lock down an impact site if it was a series of similar events in North America, so far there is evidence of impact but not a true crater ( Tungaska is probably a better example but not as topical or sexy )
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 07, 2013, 03:00:58 AM
The incredible social memory of certain mammals -- in this case, dolphins.  It supercedes  even that of elephants & monkeys, who harbour good social memory.  Very interesting.  Read on...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/08/06/us-sci-dolphin-memory.html


Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 15, 2013, 01:01:44 AM
"The Breathing Earth"

(http://i939.photobucket.com/albums/ad239/fotogalri/BreathingEarth1-3_zps3fdf2396.gif)

(http://i939.photobucket.com/albums/ad239/fotogalri/BreathingEarth2-2-2_zps38f005a1.gif)

Click here:
http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/08/14/mesmerizing-gifs-of-breathing-earth/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 29, 2013, 06:42:06 PM
(We) were all once Martians??!!  It's possible.  Read on...

http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/news/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com/2013/08/29/life-may-have-developed-on-mars-not-earth-scientist-says
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bill_Berg on August 29, 2013, 09:00:35 PM
How did I not know about this thread? Awesome.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 13, 2013, 04:39:10 AM
Beware the Blob...

(http://i939.photobucket.com/albums/ad239/fotogalri/ugly-blobfish_2630737b_zpse06934b5.jpeg)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/10304954/Endangered-blobfish-is-voted-ugliest-animal.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: louisstamos on September 13, 2013, 09:35:36 AM
(We) were all once Martians??!!  It's possible.  Read on...

http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/news/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com/2013/08/29/life-may-have-developed-on-mars-not-earth-scientist-says

(http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m2i43wByNw1qf9if6o1_500.jpg)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 28, 2013, 05:36:12 AM
Global warming, greenhouse gas emissions & the threat to humanity...how the earth's atmosphere has been damaged over the centuries and why the trend will continue (for centuries to come)...

As world temperatures and sea levels rise, the effects of global warming will be felt most acutely in Canada and other countries far from the equator, says a Canadian researcher and co-ordinating author of the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

A Canadian scientist and co-ordinating author of the IPCC report says it’s the clearest evidence yet that global warming is occurring – and that humans are the main cause.

“Evidence for a warming climate is getting stronger and stronger, and the evidence of the influence of human activities on that climate change is getting stronger and stronger,” said Gregory Flato, an Environment Canada scientist and manager of the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis.

"...climate change and warming in particular is amplified – that is, it’s larger – at high latitudes. So warming over Canada is larger than the warming that has been experienced [worldwide] and it is projected to continue that way. That warming over Canada will continue to be more rapid than the global [average] warming," ...

...30-page synopsis of its report on the physical science of climate change:

1. The situation is man-made – and dire
2. Weather will get more extreme
3. It will take centuries to fix,at least
4. Much is still unknown or uncertain

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/science/climate-change-will-be-felt-strongly-in-countries-such-as-canada-researcher-says/article14588012/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: KGB on October 07, 2013, 08:52:04 AM
"Dire... extreme... centuries to fix.... but all of that's uncertain."  I don't know about you, but I'm thinking that point #4 is probably the most salient.  How many failures can the climate alarmists suffer with their models and prognostications before we take what they say with a grain of salt?
Title: Re: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on October 07, 2013, 12:58:06 PM
"Dire... extreme... centuries to fix.... but all of that's uncertain."  I don't know about you, but I'm thinking that point #4 is probably the most salient.  How many failures can the climate alarmists suffer with their models and prognostications before we take what they say with a grain of salt?

It's a simple chemical process. If you dump billions of tons of pollutants and CO2 in the air then you are changing the chemical makeup of the atmosphere. How is this hard to understand?

Even if it doesn't lead to global warming (which it does it most certainly leads to smog and unclean air. Personally I'm not interested in living in a world that looks like Blade Runner.

As for uncertainty - there's always a degree of uncertainty in science. I guess we might as well throw out the theory of gravity as well,  because there's a level of uncertainty.
Title: Re: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on October 07, 2013, 01:29:35 PM
"Dire... extreme... centuries to fix.... but all of that's uncertain."  I don't know about you, but I'm thinking that point #4 is probably the most salient.  How many failures can the climate alarmists suffer with their models and prognostications before we take what they say with a grain of salt?

It's a simple chemical process. If you dump billions of tons of pollutants and CO2 in the air then you are changing the chemical makeup of the atmosphere. How is this hard to understand?

Even if it doesn't lead to global warming (which it does it most certainly leads to smog and unclean air. Personally I'm not interested in living in a world that looks like Blade Runner.

As for uncertainty - there's always a degree of uncertainty in science. I guess we might as well throw out the theory of gravity as well,  because there's a level of uncertainty.

This hits the nail on the head of my opinion on it, too.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: crazyperfectdevil on October 07, 2013, 03:03:10 PM
the reason why there is uncertainty is because this is all an insanely complex system...but from what we know ..which of course is limited ..but here's the issue i have..the people saying this is going to be a problem have spent their lives understanding what they can of this stuff ....the people saying this isn't an issue ...aren't educated on it at all...  so while i don't think science can ever offer certainty..especially in regards to a future event ..and in such a complex system ..i still feel like their "guess" (obviously more than a guess)  is better then the guy on the street who just says..."look there's snow...where's your global warming now."
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: moon111 on October 07, 2013, 08:57:32 PM
In my hometown, the population has gotten smaller.  Yet for miles around where I grew up, forest as been replaced with houses, concrete, asphalt.  These people think they help the environment by recycling some trash, but they've destroyed all the mother nature I ever grew up with. 
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hap_leaf on October 07, 2013, 09:28:34 PM
Don't worry, the Earth will take everything back after we are all long gone.
Check out Discovery Channel's "Life After People" for some sobering views, many episodes on Youtube.
Title: Re: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on October 07, 2013, 11:52:16 PM
Don't worry, the Earth will take everything back after we are all long gone.
Check out Discovery Channel's "Life After People" for some sobering views, many episodes on Youtube.

And the earth will eventually be incinerated once the sun turns into a supernova.

I better go watch a predictable sitcom before I gouge out my eyes :)

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: leafsjunkie on October 08, 2013, 12:36:53 PM
Our sun won't go supernova, it'll change into a red giant over billions of years. :)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on October 08, 2013, 01:11:04 PM
Our sun won't go supernova, it'll change into a red giant over billions of years. :)

There we go :)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: iwas11in67 on October 08, 2013, 01:12:31 PM
I just hope the Leafs win a cup before then.  :)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: TheMightyOdin on October 08, 2013, 02:47:00 PM
Our sun won't go supernova, it'll change into a red giant over billions of years. :)

There we go :)

And after that he milky way itself will collide with another galaxy (I forget the name now)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on October 08, 2013, 03:05:21 PM
Andromeda is slated to intersect with the Milky Way some 1 to 1.5 billion years before the Sun creeps Red, fwiw, not exactly sure of the timing but it should be a good show!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: leafsjunkie on October 08, 2013, 03:36:46 PM
Andromeda is slated to intersect with the Milky Way some 1 to 1.5 billion years before the Sun creeps Red, fwiw, not exactly sure of the timing but it should be a good show!

That would be awesome to be there for! What is seen in the sky will look a lot different then!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: TheMightyOdin on October 08, 2013, 09:10:10 PM
Andromeda is slated to intersect with the Milky Way some 1 to 1.5 billion years before the Sun creeps Red, fwiw, not exactly sure of the timing but it should be a good show!

That would be awesome to be there for! What is seen in the sky will look a lot different then!

I don't think our eyesight would be very good if we could make it to an age of a few billion years😲
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 07, 2014, 07:41:38 PM
The science behind the sound... Stradivarius versus the rest...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/stradivarius-violins-lose-in-blind-test-against-new-ones-1.2601191


Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: RedLeaf on April 07, 2014, 09:34:11 PM
Anyone watching Seth MacFarlane's Cosmos? It pretty good. Better than I was expecting.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Crucialness Key on April 08, 2014, 12:08:04 PM
Anyone watching Seth MacFarlane's Cosmos? It pretty good. Better than I was expecting.

You mean Neil DeGrasse Tyson's Cosmos!  :-D

I'm enjoying it also.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 08, 2014, 07:37:52 PM
Yup, enjoying every minute of the Neil/Seth science show.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on April 09, 2014, 08:19:08 AM
I couldn't get more than 60 seconds through that show before getting bored out of my mind...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Potvin29 on April 09, 2014, 09:30:38 AM
I couldn't get more than 60 seconds through that show before getting bored out of my mind...

Might be more up your alley: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7ssUivM-eM
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on April 09, 2014, 10:15:47 AM
I couldn't get more than 60 seconds through that show before getting bored out of my mind...

Might be more up your alley: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7ssUivM-eM

Haha. :P
But to my own credit, I've loved the 'Planet Earth', 'Life', and 'Human Planet' type shows/series.  From what I saw of Cosmos (which, admittedly, was very little), there's too much fake animation/theoretical/what if type mumbo-jumbo.  It just didn't reel me in.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 09, 2014, 10:29:50 AM
You might like Earth Story with Aubrey Manning, an 8 part BBC production about Earth's geology in relation to biology ( Professor Aubrey is a biologist ). Granted it's from 1998 but it still kicks donkey.

Here's episode 1 on the youtube...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ge5mD938K0[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on April 09, 2014, 04:59:18 PM
You might like Earth Story with Aubrey Manning, an 8 part BBC production about Earth's geology in relation to biology ( Professor Aubrey is a biologist ). Granted it's from 1998 but it still kicks donkey.

Here's episode 1 on the youtube...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ge5mD938K0[/youtube]

OR the BBC's "Wonders" series. Wonders of Life, Wonders of the Solar System, and Wonders of the Universe
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 18, 2014, 07:45:10 PM
For sure froggie

I'm in the middle of re-watching Planet Earth, beauty.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on April 18, 2014, 10:23:31 PM
That's a good one too; I've got it on BluRay.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on June 27, 2014, 02:01:41 AM
Like a hall of mirrors, nanostructures trap photons inside ultrathin solar cells (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140422100015.htm)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on October 21, 2014, 10:54:33 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/mars-orbiters-survive-close-encounter-with-comet-siding-spring-1.2805611
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on October 23, 2014, 01:41:53 AM
Material is Bloody Slippery (http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/2014/10/18/2014-10-18-3/)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on November 12, 2014, 11:28:00 PM
Crazy 10 year mission to land a probe on a comet hits the third arc... (http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/technology/cosmic-1st-spacecraft-sends-lander-toward-comet/ar-AA7HXAy?ocid=binganswers)

Quote
While further checks were needed to ascertain the state of the 220-pound (100-kilogram) lander, the fact that it was resting on the surface of the comet was already a huge success — the highlight of Rosetta's decade-long mission to study comets and learn more about the origins of these celestial bodies.

Scientists have likened the trillion or so comets in our solar system to time capsules that are virtually unchanged since the earliest moments of the universe.

"By studying one in enormous detail, we can hope to unlock the puzzle of all of the others," said Mark McCaughrean, a senior scientific adviser to the mission.

The mission will also give researchers the opportunity to test the theory that comets brought organic matter and water to Earth billions of years ago, said Klim Churyumov, one of the two astronomers who discovered the comet in 1969.

Math did this... (http://www.terma.com/press/news-2009/last-visit-home-for-comet-chaser/)

Quote
Since launch in 2004, Rosetta has followed a clever route including a number of so-called "swingbys", where the satellite uses the gravity from planets to be provided with additional speed.

Previously, Rosetta has implemented Earth and Mars swingbys. The maneuver on 13 November is the last swingby, which will increase Rosetta's speed from the current 13.3 km/sec. to 16.6 km/sec. - or from 48,000 km/h to 60,000 km/h. This rapid speed is necessary in order for Rosetta to keep pace with the comet and to enter into orbit around the comet when that time comes, following a journey of more than seven billion kilometers.

That's some trick shot.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Highlander on November 13, 2014, 11:26:21 AM
Man I didnt know this site was filled with such Brainiac's.  Good for you all!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on December 13, 2014, 03:51:16 PM
Queen guitarist Brian May has warned that our obliteration is inevitable unless we take the threat of asteroid impacts seriously. May, who has PHD in astrophysics, called for a global effort to ensure a 100-fold increase in the detection and monitoring of asteroids.

His concerns have been echoed by royal astronomer Martin Rees and a group of more than 100 prominent physicists, artists and business leaders including Richard Dawkins, Brian Cox and Peter Gabriel.

The group have co-signed a declaration demanding increased use of technology to detect and track near-Earth asteroids and better discovery and tracking of new asteroid threats. An asteroid big enough to destroy an entire city is likely to hit Earth once every 100 years, it has been estimated.

Referencing the asteroid explosion in Tunguska, Russia in 1908, May said it would only take one big impact to wipe us all out: "We are currently aware of less than one percent of objects comparable to the one that impacted at Tunguska, and nobody knows when the next big one will hit."

The Tunguska event, where an asteroid exploded 4-6 miles above the Earth's surface, was still powerful enough to destroy an area roughly 800 square miles in size with shockwaves felt as far away as the UK.

Royal astronomer Martin Rees added that the human race must make it "our mission to find asteroids before they find us". The first World Asteroid Day will take place on 30 June 2015, the anniversary of the Tunguska explosion. Founding partners include The Planetary Society and California Academy of Sciences. Events will take place around the world to help raise awareness of the threat posed by asteroids.
 (http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-12/03/brian-may-asteroid-day)

Yes, Brian May is a PHD astrophysicist....
Title: The Science Thread
Post by: Zanzibar Buck-Buck McFate on December 13, 2014, 06:48:20 PM
I would certainly listen to Martin Rees' advice.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on May 04, 2015, 10:48:54 PM
Scientist 'accidentally' creates glasses that allow people to see full spectrum.

Dr Daniel Bor, of the University of Sussex, said: ‘The main thing I have problems with is when people use red and green on graphs in seminars and I can’t tell the difference between them.

‘And there’s my occasionally weird dress sense, which my wife puts me right on. But putting on the glasses for the first time was really quite an exciting moment. I was with my daughter in the gym and suddenly her lips stood out.

‘She was wearing a red-orange jumper and suddenly it stood out from the surroundings.’

The glasses, which were originally developed for medical use, are the brainchild of US scientist Mark Changizi.

The lenses filter out bands of light that interfere with the ability to distinguish various shades of red and green. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2275052/Have-scientists-created-lenses-cure-person-s-colour-blindness-New-glasses-help-sufferers-distinguish-red-green.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 04, 2015, 11:52:41 PM
Scientist 'accidentally' creates glasses that allow people to see full spectrum.

Dr Daniel Bor, of the University of Sussex, said: ‘The main thing I have problems with is when people use red and green on graphs in seminars and I can’t tell the difference between them.

‘And there’s my occasionally weird dress sense, which my wife puts me right on. But putting on the glasses for the first time was really quite an exciting moment. I was with my daughter in the gym and suddenly her lips stood out.

‘She was wearing a red-orange jumper and suddenly it stood out from the surroundings.’

The glasses, which were originally developed for medical use, are the brainchild of US scientist Mark Changizi.

The lenses filter out bands of light that interfere with the ability to distinguish various shades of red and green. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2275052/Have-scientists-created-lenses-cure-person-s-colour-blindness-New-glasses-help-sufferers-distinguish-red-green.html)

Unfortunately, the author of the article doesn't have much understanding of colour vision deficiencies.  Coloured lenses are nothing new when it comes to trying to aid colour vision deficient individuals distinguish between colours a little better.  They can help a colour vision deficient individual, say, distinguish different coloured wires better or to perform better on a colour vision test.  It's simple technology that's been used for decades and has fairly limited practicality.  Distinguishing between shades of colours isn't remotely the same as seeing them "normally" in the full visual spectrum.  Such lenses don't cure colour vision deficiencies and they certainly don't allow colour vision deficient individuals see the full visual spectrum of colours.  But if the marketer can get £190 a pop for them, more power to him.  I can guarantee that virtually any colour vision deficient individual who buys these glasses will use them briefly to test out on a few things and then will quickly realize that they have no practical value in real life.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on May 09, 2015, 09:59:07 PM
Interesting, thanks Shrimp, you have first hand knowledge of this? The article does state that the glasses hamper other areas of colour perception after the headline. To me it seems like this 'accident' contributed to a refinement of subtle red green perception, not that it cured anything. It peaked my interest as one of my good buddies and his brother are colour blind and are looking at this to help them.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 12:35:00 AM
Interesting, thanks Shrimp, you have first hand knowledge of this? The article does state that the glasses hamper other areas of colour perception after the headline. To me it seems like this 'accident' contributed to a refinement of subtle red green perception, not that it cured anything. It peaked my interest as one of my good buddies and his brother are colour blind and are looking at this to help them.

I'm an optometrist, so among my studies I've taken a course in colour perception.  By now, I've seen thousands of patients with colour vision defects and diagnosed hundreds of those (the rest had been previously diagnosed).

I'll try to explain it all in simple terms, though I'm not sure how simple I can make it.  Normal human colour perception of the visual spectrum involves three colour vision pigments in the retina.  In simple terms, they can be considered the pigments for the detection of short, medium and long wavelength light.  Short wavelengths are blue, medium wavelengths are green, long wavelengths are red.  People with colour vision defects are either entirely lacking or partially lacking one of the three pigments.  How does this affect their perception of colour?  I wish I had a chalkboard to draw on to illustrate, but given that I don't, I don't know, maybe I can sort of draw here.  Consider normal colour perception to be represented by a triangle.  All the colours of the visual spectrum can be represented by a point anywhere within that triangle.  The points of the triangle represent the three colour vision pigments, which I'll call B, G, and R.  Here's a X-Y axis to try to represent what I'm saying, with B on the traditional negative side, G on the Y axis, and R on the traditional positive side:

                                             G
                                             |
                                             |      1
                                             |
                                             |
                                             |
                                             |      23 4
                                             |
                                             |
B--------------------------------------------------------------------R

How we perceive colours depends on where the colour falls within the triangle, basically representing how much that wavelength of light stimulates each of the colour vision pigments, so by it's position along the -X axis, the +X axis, and the Y-axis.  Colours 1, 2, 3 and 4 will all look different to somebody with normal colour perception, although 2 and 3 will appear similar.  Now, somebody who is entirely deficient in the G pigment will see no difference between colours 1 and 2, as they fall equally far along the X-axis, and it doesn't matter in the least where they fall on the Y-axis.  Those colours will appear obviously different to somebody with normal colour vision but very much the same to somebody who's G-deficient.  Colour vision tests are designed to exploit this situation, where certain numbers are essentially invisible to colour vision deficients because of where their component colours fall in the spectrum.

When anybody (normal colour vision or not) looks through a tinted lens, it alters their perception of colours, and so too will these glasses.  In the case of somebody who's colour vision deficient, when looking at a colour vision test, it will alter the perceived wavelength of the carefully designed and chosen colours too allow the distinction of what was designed to be invisible to the colour vision deficient.  Say, it might make 2 look a little more like 3, so the invisible distinction between 1 and 2 might be skewed more to be like the distinction between 1 and 3, which is more detectable to the G-deficient.  This isn't restoring colour vision;  it doesn't grant the ability to make colour distinctions along the Y-axis, and it never can or will.  If one is looking through blue-purple lenses, it will make everything look a lot more blue-purple.  Yes, for the colour vision deficient, it can allow some more distinction between some shades that might otherwise appear identical.  On the other hand, not only does it not provide any more richness of colour perception, it actually takes away from it.  Try seeing how long you'd want to wear blue-purple lenses before you couldn't stand how skewed it makes all colours to looking blue-purple.  That statement applies equally to colour vision deficient people.

To me, the "accident" part of the story is either an angle to try to pitch the supposed novelty (and it actually is nothing novel in the least) of the item, or perhaps it was something that was accidentally enough "discovered" by whoever is making this product in the same way that Columbus "discovered" America long, long after others had already done so.  If your friend and his brother would desperately like to be able to conceivably "pass" a traditional colour vision test and it's worth the money to them to do have whatever experience that might be, then I suppose they can do it.  But they should know that it really only helps them "pass" the test by actually changing the test, as it's effectively changing the carefully chosen colours (as they meet the eye) enough to see some colour distinctions better.  At that point, they're not really passing the colour vision test, but rather a drastically altered version of the colour vision test, so it's pretty meaningless outside of a fleeting revelation of sorts, I suppose.  Beyond that, it's just an expensive pair of glasses that makes everything look really blue-purple.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on May 10, 2015, 01:40:18 AM
Very cool, thank you for the detailed response. My friend and his brother are mostly interested in seeing what they don't normally see, nothing about passing any tests. I'll pass along what you've said and save them the time and trouble, hopefully.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 10, 2015, 08:44:07 AM
I always fail miserably at the test with the numbers made of little dots. But I easily passed the colour vision test where you have to arrange a series of 15 colours pigments in a row.

Apparently that means I can be a pilot?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 09:29:16 AM
I always fail miserably at the test with the numbers made of little dots. But I easily passed the colour vision test where you have to arrange a series of 15 colours pigments in a row.

Apparently that means I can be a pilot?

Generally, that would mean you have a partial colour vision deficiency, so you would have a full complement of two of the colour vision pigments and a partial complement of the third.  Sometimes when people fail the Ishihara test as you do and pass the D15 as you also do, there are other, further colour vision tests that might be done to screen through candidate pilots.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 10, 2015, 10:07:11 AM
Interesting. The pilot comment was based on what the doc said. Not that I'm actually considering it. I'm assuming my general vision would be too bad as I'm myopic and have astigmatism (slightly different in each eye, but the optometrist made both lenses the same.)

I have real troubles with distinguishing darker colours like dark blue/black or dark brown/black. They all seem like black to me. Also, certain green/brown mixes are difficult and green/greys. This isn't great because part of my job is picking colours and finishes for buildings.

If I had the cash, I'd seriously consider laser eye surgery. Apparently I have a thick cornea. I guess that means they can screw up and still have tissue left to fix it? lol

Though in truth, the thought of anything coming remotely close to my eyes freaks me the hell out, so I probably couldn't go through with it. I just about died while watching "the needle scene" in Fire in the Sky.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 11:23:48 AM
Very cool, thank you for the detailed response. My friend and his brother are mostly interested in seeing what they don't normally see, nothing about passing any tests. I'll pass along what you've said and save them the time and trouble, hopefully.

The only reason I mentioned more than once passing a colour vision test is that it's one of the very few practical real-life benefits of using such a lens, and even then it's not at all very practical or applicable to anything in real-life.  Your friends would not be able to see any colours they don't normally see, they would merely be able to differentiate between colours that otherwise look the same a little better.  Meaning if there are two visibly different coloured objects that they can't differentiate, putting on such a lens could make them say, "oh, yeah, those two objects aren't the same colour after all".  They still wouldn't be able to see the colours that you and I see, not even close.

I've spent more time (by choice) writing and answering about this than I normally would because bad science writing and science misinformation just gets under my skin.  And there are number of flat-out falsehoods in that article that are grossly misleading to the layperson.

"cured colour blindness?"  False.
"glasses that allow people to see full spectrum"  So very false.
"allowing those with the most common form of the condition to see them properly"  Oh my God, so false, false, false.

I'll make a couple of analogies to hearing.  If we consider the normal hearing experience to be like listening to FM radio, a colour vision deficiency is like listening to AM radio.  Words can be heard and understood, music can be listened to.  But it's not the full audio experience.  Using a tint lens is like adding a graphic equalizer to AM radio.  You can enhance some of the sound and suppress some of it.  But you can't turn the AM radio audio range into FM with it.

The other imperfect hearing analogy I would make would be to imagine a colour vision deficiency being like the inability to distinguish between some voices, meaning some entirely different people would sound so alike that you can't tell their voices apart, even though most people can easily tell them apart.  Adding an intensely tinted lens would be like putting on earphones that, say, changed the pitch of perceived similar voices (imagine Alvin and the Chipmunks kind of voices) to make them sound more dissimilar and distinguishable.  On the upside, hey, you can hear the difference between the voices better now, for whatever that's worth;  on the downside, everybody sounds like Alvin now (just like everything would look purple), and it's pretty irritating.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 10, 2015, 12:05:45 PM
I've spent more time (by choice) writing and answering about this than I normally would because bad science writing and science misinformation just gets under my skin.  And there are number of flat-out falsehoods in that article that are grossly misleading to the layperson.

So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 12:22:28 PM
I've spent more time (by choice) writing and answering about this than I normally would because bad science writing and science misinformation just gets under my skin.  And there are number of flat-out falsehoods in that article that are grossly misleading to the layperson.

So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?

I'd only heard of her through a Keith Law tweet to an article a while back, but after reading that, yes you're very right.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: bustaheims on May 10, 2015, 02:48:14 PM
So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?

Ugh. Food Babe. The worst.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 10, 2015, 06:13:01 PM
So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?

Ugh. Food Babe. The worst.


I just poisoned my son with a glass of dihydrogen monoxide.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: bustaheims on May 10, 2015, 06:55:45 PM
So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?

Ugh. Food Babe. The worst.

I just poisoned my son with a glass of hydrogen dioxide.

You mean dihydrogen monoxide.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 06:58:21 PM
So, I'm guessing you're not a part of the FoodBabeArmy?

Ugh. Food Babe. The worst.


I just poisoned my son with a glass of hydrogen dioxide.

I'm hoping you mean dihydrogen monoxide, because if you just gave him a glass of hydrogen peroxide as you claim, I'm obliged to report you to the authorities.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 10, 2015, 07:42:15 PM
Why would you guys alter my post like that?

Either or, my five year old can't pronounce it, so therefore they're both bad.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 10, 2015, 11:40:26 PM
Why would you guys alter my post like that?

The guy admits to a crime, then lies about it and starts covering his tracks.  Sheesh, you think you know some people...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 11, 2015, 02:14:57 AM
To each their own... on food science, bloggers, and the Food Babe...

A larger trend is lurking beneath this spat over digital influence: ... a growing crisis of credibility in food labeling.

The trend toward healthy, natural food has buoyed bloggers like Hari. She's made headlines and ignited hashtag wars by pointing a finger at allegedly toxic chemicals in products from brands such as Starbucks, General Mills and Chick-fil-A, despite having no relevant academic qualifications. It's also the reason why newer, more agile brands like Chipotle, Panera and Shake Shack are challenging longtime market leaders like McDonald's and Taco Bell...

... [Americans] might trust influencers like Food Babe more than they trust Burger King or an agency working on the food chain's behalf.

"'Qualifications' is an interesting term: There are academic qualifications, government qualifications, and life experience," he says. "Some people suffer greatly due to gluten allergies before changing their diets, experimenting with different foods and improving their lives. Are they then qualified to comment [on dietary issues]?

The credibility crisis, however, can't be pinned entirely on experts with dubious credentials: Brands themselves bear a large share of the blame. Lewis says that on one hand, "saying you're a nutritionist doesn't really mean anything." But neither does much of the language in food marketing. Classic taglines and fad phrases like "Eat Fresh," "all-natural flavor" and "low fat" represent the very sort of miscommunication that inspired the rise of Food Babe and others like her in the first place.


http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/food-babe-debacle-underscores-crisis-credibility-surrounding-what-we-eat-164071
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on May 11, 2015, 01:07:00 PM
To each their own... on food science, bloggers, and the Food Babe...

A larger trend is lurking beneath this spat over digital influence: ... a growing crisis of credibility in food labeling.

The trend toward healthy, natural food has buoyed bloggers like Hari. She's made headlines and ignited hashtag wars by pointing a finger at allegedly toxic chemicals in products from brands such as Starbucks, General Mills and Chick-fil-A, despite having no relevant academic qualifications. It's also the reason why newer, more agile brands like Chipotle, Panera and Shake Shack are challenging longtime market leaders like McDonald's and Taco Bell...

... [Americans] might trust influencers like Food Babe more than they trust Burger King or an agency working on the food chain's behalf.

"'Qualifications' is an interesting term: There are academic qualifications, government qualifications, and life experience," he says. "Some people suffer greatly due to gluten allergies before changing their diets, experimenting with different foods and improving their lives. Are they then qualified to comment [on dietary issues]?

The credibility crisis, however, can't be pinned entirely on experts with dubious credentials: Brands themselves bear a large share of the blame. Lewis says that on one hand, "saying you're a nutritionist doesn't really mean anything." But neither does much of the language in food marketing. Classic taglines and fad phrases like "Eat Fresh," "all-natural flavor" and "low fat" represent the very sort of miscommunication that inspired the rise of Food Babe and others like her in the first place.


http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/food-babe-debacle-underscores-crisis-credibility-surrounding-what-we-eat-164071

I think for certain things people can speak about what affects them, but you always have to be careful of confirmation bias.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 11, 2015, 01:10:43 PM

I'm pretty sure this is the article linked to by Keith Law that HS mentioned about this Food Babe huckster. Worth a read:

The Food Babe Blogger is full of, uh, malarkey (http://gawker.com/the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit-1694902226)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: MetalRaven on May 11, 2015, 02:23:33 PM

I'm pretty sure this is the article linked to by Keith Law that HS mentioned about this Food Babe huckster. Worth a read:

The Food Babe Blogger is full of, uh, malarkey (http://gawker.com/the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit-1694902226)

Thanks Nik, that was great. We should have a debunking conspiracies thread...but the powers that be wont let us! Show us the moon landing certificate!

also:

What crazy science is this? I blame the Oil companies (Not really...I am sane)

https://youtu.be/_c6HsiixFS8
(Sprinkler rainbows)

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on May 11, 2015, 03:26:16 PM
Dihydrogen monoxide strikes again!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 11, 2015, 03:35:05 PM
Before heaping scorn on someone, it's always best to look at both sides of the equation...(you never know what one might find):

There’s plenty of scientists and consumer organizations that back this message and this writer completely ignores the mountains of evidence that synthetic, carcinogenic and neurotoxic insecticides are bad for human health and the environment. These are not allowed in organic food by government certification. Maybe in the end some of these chemicals are ok to ingest–but I’d rather not take the chance. People like this author are so twisted that they seem to pretending that these multinational conglomerates are doing the US a favor by dumping these (largely untested) chemicals in what we eat.

...who is the author of “The Food Babe Blogger is Full of $hit”...
She is undoubtedly pro-chemical and pro-GMO and has proven this fact over and over again but her background might be the most convincing...she worked for Amvac Chemical, as reported in the Seattle Times, “Amvac Chemical in Los Angeles has found a profitable — and controversial — niche by buying manufacturing rights to older pesticides, many of them at risk of being banned or restricted because of safety concerns”. Yes, you read that right, a company that sells dangerous and unsafe chemicals for peofits.

Amvac has a collaboration agreement with Monsanto to co-market Roundup ready platforms. The same Roundup that has glyphosate, which has been listed by the IARC and WHO as a probable carcinogen and the same Roundup that is directly associated with GMO crops.

...email from (the Science Babe's) ex-colleague:
Dear Vani..."Good science is based on producing original work and publishing in a peer reviewed context, self published armchair science as scibabe.com is peddling gives science a bad name. Taking swipes at the work and opinions of others is not science, unless you have original data that draws other work into question. What makes you and her different is that you don’t claim to be a scientist. If you have solid reasoning, you don’t need to be vitriolic in your posts as science babe is, with much of her abuse directed towards you...

...Yvette Guinevere d’Entremont has no peer reviewed scientific publications. 2) Her master’s thesis from Anglia Ruskin University was not deemed of sufficient quality for publication. 3) Her claim that she was a college professor is laughable"...

Starbucks chooses not to use caramel coloring class IV in their coffee drinks overseas? Don’t we deserve the same safer ingredients here in the United States?Caramel coloring level IV is considered a possible carcinogen by the IRAC and National Toxicology Program and scientists at both the Consumers Union and Center For Science In The Public Interest have petitioned the FDA to regulate it.

The Starbucks campaign was indeed successful! Starbucks has already started to remove caramel coloring level IV from their vanilla syrup and whip cream and are removing it from the rest of their drinks.

Consumer Reports recently tested produce and recommends eating organically to avoid synthetic pesticides. They believe organic is “always the best choice because it is better for your health, the environment, and the people who grow our food",...Synthetic chemical pesticides are NOT allowed to be used for food certified by USDA as organic. Organic agriculture is safer for the environment, the water, the birds and bees too.

Organic cows also graze on grass at least 120 days of the year, and don’t eat Roundup-ready GMO crops that have been doused with glyphosate and bad for our environment...

Read entire article and learn:
http://foodbabe.com/response-to-gawker-the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit/ (http://foodbabe.com/response-to-gawker-the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit/)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: bustaheims on May 12, 2015, 12:27:13 PM
The worst part about this garbage is how she uses "chemicals" as if it's a dangerous and dirty word. Everything - and I mean EVERYTHING - on this planet is made of chemicals. They are not something to be feared on their own. Just because you have trouble pronouncing their name or don't understand what they are doesn't mean they're bad for you, but that's often the position she takes on things.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 12, 2015, 03:20:49 PM

The depressing thing is that there's really nothing new about this kind of fraud. Con artists have been selling snake oil to people for centuries. Even the defenses remain the same "That man telling you my miracle cure is bogus? He's just trying to sell you his own miracle cure!"

Simply put if someone "doesn't claim to be a scientist" then their opinions of scientific matters mean very little to me.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on May 12, 2015, 03:27:06 PM
Read entire article and learn:
http://foodbabe.com/response-to-gawker-the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit/ (http://foodbabe.com/response-to-gawker-the-food-babe-blogger-is-full-of-shit/)

A heaping pile of garbage...there is nothing to learn from someone who doesn't know the first thing about the topic they are discussing.

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 13, 2015, 05:08:17 PM
So,  Starbucks is full of sh__ for having removed caramel coloring;  the WHO and scientific organizations are full of sh__ for warning about certain chemicals, additives, (growth) hormones (some of which are banned in Europe & elsewhere);  practically anyone who speaks up about our food (& it's relation to our health); Dr. Oz is full of __ (even though he's a surgeon AND was verbally attacked very virulently recently (investigation revealed those who wanted him removed from the board were paid to do so); W5 (the investigative program) was full of sh__ for exposing the truth about the true cost of pharmaceuticals, the connection between lobbyists & politicians (the influence), investigative reports undertaken by Harvard & Princeton showcasing the deep connection university/etc scientists (even researchers) who's work, results, and tie-ins yielded to Pharma's 'demands', etc ...

So, GMO foods is something heroic; corporations are heros; chemicals of very, very questionable natures should be hailed and ingested with impunity; our environment is just fine, keep dumping on it; anyone (yes, even a scientist, a medical doctor, a health care practitioner who preaches a moderate balanced regimen, etcetera etcetera should all be seen as a threat and need to be vilified for so much as questioning anything remotely having to do with any product at all -- wipe them out!

Yes,  additives and chemicals are everywhere -- even water is a chemical.  But, when certain types additives & chemicals are added to our food,  when there's too much wrong, it can be harmful -- the effects on one's health can be cumulative.

These are NOT what we should be ingesting:
http://livingmaxwell.com/what-the-media-food-industry-wont-tell-you
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 13, 2015, 05:35:03 PM
Dr. Oz is full of __

No, he's one of those reasonable, well informed, honest doctors who sells "magic" cures.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA0wKeokWUU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA0wKeokWUU)

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Lynx on May 13, 2015, 05:49:43 PM
I can't remember the exact numbers, but since the 1970's crop yields have increased something ridiculous like 400% due to things like GMOs and if we went back to non-hybrid seeds it would be impossible to grow enough food to supply the world
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on May 13, 2015, 06:00:48 PM
Dr. Oz is full of __ (even though he's a surgeon AND was verbally attacked very virulently

I'm not going to bother to go into the whole concept of peer reviewed evidence because it's completely lacking but yeah, when Dr Mehmet Oz is talking about things that aren't remotely a part of his scope of practice, he's talking out of his rear end.  Being a surgeon doesn't make him an expert on nutrition in the same way that my being a physician doesn't make me a cardiothoracic surgeon.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 13, 2015, 08:22:47 PM
I was just being sarcastic.  No, is not full of s__. 
He  does well to inform. 

And no, he's not a quack, but very open-minded, and very outspoken against GMOs (for which he got vilified for in the first place).
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 13, 2015, 09:59:27 PM

What he's being vilified is admitting before Congress that many of the products he pushes as "miracles" have no medical evidence to support their claims. That doesn't make him a quack, it makes him a fraud. It means he does the opposite of inform because to inform requires information. He misleads, if not outright lies.

"I actually do personally believe in the in the items that I talk about on the show...I recognize that oftentimes they don't have the scientific muster to present as fact."

That's from his congressional testimony. Selling people "miracle" cures is trading on their desperation. People can buy, and sell, all of the snake oil they want. They just can't call it science and, when under oath, admit as much.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 13, 2015, 10:51:53 PM
Oh, he's being vilified for far more than his congressional testimony. His consistent peddling of scientifically void treatments is deplorable.

Reiki, psychics, homeopathy, etc.

He brought Mike Adams on his show. He of naturalnews.com, the worst website on the planet.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 14, 2015, 07:16:25 AM
Oh, he's being vilified for far more than his congressional testimony. His consistent peddling of scientifically void treatments is deplorable.

Reiki, psychics, homeopathy, etc.

He brought Mike Adams on his show. He of naturalnews.com, the worst website on the planet.


The Royal Family, particularly the Her Majesty the Queen, can attest to homeopathic medicine.  Even Paul McCartney swears by it. 
No one professes cure.  It helps with whatever symptoms they have.

Not all individuals are the same.  Everyone is different.  Therefore, what helps one may not be of the same results for another.

Just because it didn't or doesn't help you doesn't mean that it should be automatically negated.  What about drugs and their side-effects?

What I can't tolerate isn't the same for someone else.  It doesn't automatically mean that said medication is not good or that it has no benefits whatsoever.  To someone else it may help them even if it is for the short term.

If you're going to label everything as some sort of quack or fraud, just remember, one size doesn't fit all.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 14, 2015, 08:09:55 AM
This was the actual quote by Dr.Oz (testifying before the Congressional committee):

"I get that you do a lot of good on your show," McCaskill told Oz, "but I don't get why you need to say this stuff because you know it's not true."

Oz insisted he believes in the supplements he talks about on his show as short-term crutches, and even has his family try them. But there's no long-term miracle pill out there without diet and exercise, he said.

“I actually do personally believe in the items I talk about on the show," he said. "I passionately study them. I recognize they don’t have the scientific muster to present as fact but nevertheless I would give my audience the advice I give my family all the time, and I have given my family these products. Specifically the ones you mentioned, then I’m comfortable with that part."

Within weeks of Oz's comments...a Florida-based operation began marketing a dietary supplement called Pure Green Coffee, with claims that the chlorogenic acid found in the coffee beans could help people lose 17 pounds and cut body fat by 16 percent in 22 weeks.

The company, according to federal regulators, featured footage from "The Dr. Oz Show," to sell its supplement. Oz has no association association with the company and received no money from sales.

Oz stressed...that he has never endorsed specific supplements or received money from the sale of supplements. Nor has he allowed his image to be used in ads for supplements, he said.

"If you see my name, face or show in any type of ad, email, or other circumstance," Oz testified, "it's illegal" — and not anything he has endorsed.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/17/dr-oz-congress_n_5504209.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 14, 2015, 08:37:03 AM
http://www.vox.com/2015/2/9/8003943/john-oliver-pharmaceutical-companies




Pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars marketing drugs to doctors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQZ2UeOTO3I (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQZ2UeOTO3I)

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 14, 2015, 08:39:08 AM
Oh, he's being vilified for far more than his congressional testimony. His consistent peddling of scientifically void treatments is deplorable.

Reiki, psychics, homeopathy, etc.

He brought Mike Adams on his show. He of naturalnews.com, the worst website on the planet.


The Royal Family, particularly the Her Majesty the Queen, can attest to homeopathic medicine.  Even Paul McCartney swears by it. 
No one professes cure.  It helps with whatever symptoms they have.

Not all individuals are the same.  Everyone is different.  Therefore, what helps one may not be of the same results for another.

Just because it didn't or doesn't help you doesn't mean that it should be automatically negated.  What about drugs and their side-effects?

What I can't tolerate isn't the same for someone else.  It doesn't automatically mean that said medication is not good or that it has no benefits whatsoever.  To someone else it may help them even if it is for the short term.

If you're going to label everything as some sort of quack or fraud, just remember, one size doesn't fit all.

Agreed, which is why I haven't labeled everything as quackery or fraudulent. If someone were to produce a properly prepared scientific study that is double-blind and peer-reviewed on homeopathy, I'd change my mind. I guarantee you'll find some positive study out there, but there are also literally thousands of studies that prove it doesn't do anything (similarly to acupuncture.)

Most alternative medicine is pure fantasy. It's like the saying I've heard a number of times: "do you know what they call effective alternative medicine? Medicine."

Homeopathy is one of the worst of the quackish alternative medicines. It's whole premise completely disobeys the known laws of physics and other sciences. You're essentially consuming water, sometimes with sugars, flavorings, and other stuff to justify its cost. Diluting something doesn't make it more effective, it makes it less toxic and less effective. Most homeopathic medicines are diluted to the point that the supposed medicinal ingredient doesn't actually exist anymore. You'd have a greater chance of getting this ingredient (which on its own usually has dubious claims of any effectiveness in any concentration) by taking a sniff out of my shoes. It's true, someone may take a homeopathic medicine and get better, but I can guarantee it wasn't the medicine. There's a big difference between correlation and causation.

The appeal to nature and the placebo effect our powerful, persuasive phenomena. I'm coming down with a cold and have a sore throat. My wife is trying to force oil of oregano down my throat (somewhat literally.) The claim is I'll get better in a couple of days......     oy.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 14, 2015, 08:55:31 AM
Oh, he's being vilified for far more than his congressional testimony. His consistent peddling of scientifically void treatments is deplorable.

Reiki, psychics, homeopathy, etc.

He brought Mike Adams on his show. He of naturalnews.com, the worst website on the planet.


The Royal Family, particularly the Her Majesty the Queen, can attest to homeopathic medicine.  Even Paul McCartney swears by it. 
No one professes cure.  It helps with whatever symptoms they have.

Not all individuals are the same.  Everyone is different.  Therefore, what helps one may not be of the same results for another.

Just because it didn't or doesn't help you doesn't mean that it should be automatically negated.  What about drugs and their side-effects?

What I can't tolerate isn't the same for someone else.  It doesn't automatically mean that said medication is not good or that it has no benefits whatsoever.  To someone else it may help them even if it is for the short term.

If you're going to label everything as some sort of quack or fraud, just remember, one size doesn't fit all.

Agreed, which is why I haven't labeled everything as quackery or fraudulent. If someone were to produce a properly prepared scientific study that is double-blind and peer-reviewed on homeopathy, I'd change my mind. I guarantee you'll find some positive study out there, but there are also literally thousands of studies that prove it doesn't do anything (similarly to acupuncture.)

Most alternative medicine is pure fantasy. It's like the saying I've heard a number of times: "do you know what they call effective alternative medicine? Medicine."

Homeopathy is one of the worst of the quackish alternative medicines. It's whole premise completely disobeys the known laws of physics and other sciences. You're essentially consuming water, sometimes with sugars, flavorings, and other stuff to justify its cost. Diluting something doesn't make it more effective, it makes it less toxic and less effective. Most homeopathic medicines are diluted to the point that the supposed medicinal ingredient doesn't actually exist anymore. You'd have a greater chance of getting this ingredient (which on its own usually has dubious claims of any effectiveness in any concentration) by taking a sniff out of my shoes. It's true, someone may take a homeopathic medicine and get better, but I can guarantee it wasn't the medicine. There's a big difference between correlation and causation.

The appeal to nature and the placebo effect our powerful, persuasive phenomena. I'm coming down with a cold and have a sore throat. My wife is trying to force oil of oregano down my throat (somewhat literally.) The claim is I'll get better in a couple of days......     oy.


Absolute rubbish!  Most alternative medicine is NOT like the way you say.
I don't know much about homeopathic.  It does appear to help aome people obviously.

What I do know, (and no, I'm not speaking of Reikki or any of that stuff), is that alternative medicine that involves supplementation in the form of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, probiotics, etc.etc. can be an important part of a person's regimen to get better and improve symptoms, which is where I speak from...

...It (natural medicine) and equally Integrative Medicine saved my life.  I would be dead, yes, d-e-a-d if I hadn't been treated by it.  I have been going to regular medicine all the life long and what did it do for me? 
N-o-t-h-i-ng.  Because of conventional doctor's lack of knowledge of nutrition in general, no one could recommend anything except some drugs (with plenty of side-effects) in which by the way I have never been nutritionally sound enough to assimilate them in the first place.

I don't just speak of your friendly cute vitamin.  For me, the list is a lot deeper than that -- natural blood thinners, an anti-inflammatory, digestive enzyme, etc,
My doctor went to medical school the way all others need to do and he took it upon himself to learn the other of medicine.  Was surprised to discover that what he was taught in med school was at odds with he learned afterwards.  That's when he discovered that there is a lot more to learn than what Big Pharma wants you to know.  There are many alternatives to drugs without dubious side-effects, for various ailments some of the most common such as for thyroid, cholesterol, blood pressure, etc.

No, I have not been cured, but, my condition has stabilized and the best part -- I have not gotten any colds, viruses, flus, etc., in a long while.

And oh, by the way, Oil of Oregano is anti-viral.  It won't work magically.  It takes time.  I take it and helps when I have sore throat or a cold.

'You want to know a really good cough/cold syrup?  Echinamide by Natural Factors.  Main ingredient:  Echinacea.
(Echinacea acts as an immune booster and shouldn't be taken by those suffering from auto-immune problems, however when you need it, you need it.  No problem with that.  I take it at the onset of a cough told, as soon as I start feeling something coming on.  Works every time!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 14, 2015, 09:48:31 AM
http://www.vitalitymagazine.com/article/government-protects-drugs-while-it-seizes-natural-health-products1/

One blatant example of Health Canada’s modus operandi occurred most recently with the seizure of the anti-clotting enzyme nattokinase from the shelves of health food stores despite the fact that no deaths or side effects were ever reported (see Part One of this article in the December 2012 / January 2013 issue of Vitality). Nattokinase, in fact, has been on the shelves of health food stores for over a decade in Canada. Its increasing usage by Canadians most likely has drawn some attention from Health Canada and their bosses. Nonetheless, the product is now gone from store shelves and the explanation for why it was seized is not forthcoming from Health Canada.

An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 14, 2015, 12:02:59 PM
An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.

I'll admit I'm not a physician, so my defense of science-based medicine is based purely on what I read as a layperson.

What's your basis for making the claim that it's far superior to other prescribed medicines? And how do you know you're taking the correct dose?
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: WhatIfGodWasALeaf on May 14, 2015, 12:24:24 PM
Alternative medicine is almost entirely based on the very REAL placebo effect, it's remarkable the changes in some people if they believe what they are taking is helping them.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: bustaheims on May 14, 2015, 12:38:02 PM
Alternative medicine is almost entirely based on the very REAL placebo effect, it's remarkable the changes in some people if they believe what they are taking is helping them.

Which, to be fair, can be helpful even though the substances they're taking aren't actually doing anything. The psychological impact of believing you're getting better can have positive changes in your behaviours that can, in turn, lead to positive changes in your health and recovery. Some "alternative" treatments do have very mild physiological impact, but, yeah, most are complete garbage. Same with most vitamin supplements. If you have a healthy diet, you're usually going to get the levels of vitamins and minerals you need. The supplements you take on top of that just get flushed out. Outside of vitamin D in the winter - when our ability to get it naturally is impeded - they're entirely unnecessary and largely unhelpful.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 14, 2015, 12:38:14 PM
Exactly, Patrick. If someone poking your skin with a needle helps to relieve your pain, great! All the power to you. But please understand it's not the needle, or the opening of your "meridians" or the stimulation of your chakras...it's your belief that it works.

Many people don't understand what placebo means.

It's like the oil of oregano my wife is suggesting I try for my cold (which is not "anti-viral" btw.) She takes it and, guess what, she feels better in a couple of days. Well guess what happens when I don't take it? I feel better in a couple of days! I have a cold and that's what happens with colds: you recover from them in a couple/few days.

Scott Guvara's explanations over at Science-Based Medicine blog sum it up well:
"There’s some evidence out there demonstrating that oil of oregano will kill different species of bacteria, etc in the test tube or Petri dish ( in vitro).  If I pour a pile of salt, lime juice, Cointreau, or tequila on a Petri dish, it will likely kill most bacteria too — but that doesn’t mean margaritas can treat pneumonia." (https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-of-oregano/)

I raise this because it applies to many claims for alternative medicine. A result in one particular test with a certain set of circumstances that may or may not apply to humans is grabbed on to and waved about as irrefutable evidence of the efficacy of a certain treatment.

My concern with alternative medicine is its lack of testing and certification. I'm truly concerned that someone will suffer or even die from using alternative medicine. Not necessarily from the "medicine" itself, but perhaps by delaying or avoiding actual proven treatments.

Hey, I'm sure we all agree that if we can cure a disease by snorting a dandelion that we pick for free from our lawn rather than a pricey prescribed medicine concocted in a lab (oh, the horror!), then we'd pick that option.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on May 14, 2015, 01:20:45 PM
Exactly, Patrick. If someone poking your skin with a needle helps to relieve your pain, great! All the power to you. But please understand it's not the needle, or the opening of your "meridians" or the stimulation of your chakras...it's your belief that it works.

Many people don't understand what placebo means.

It's like the oil of oregano my wife is suggesting I try for my cold (which is not "anti-viral" btw.) She takes it and, guess what, she feels better in a couple of days. Well guess what happens when I don't take it? I feel better in a couple of days! I have a cold and that's what happens with colds: you recover from them in a couple/few days.

Scott Guvara's explanations over at Science-Based Medicine blog sum it up well:
"There’s some evidence out there demonstrating that oil of oregano will kill different species of bacteria, etc in the test tube or Petri dish ( in vitro).  If I pour a pile of salt, lime juice, Cointreau, or tequila on a Petri dish, it will likely kill most bacteria too — but that doesn’t mean margaritas can treat pneumonia." (https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-of-oregano/)

I raise this because it applies to many claims for alternative medicine. A result in one particular test with a certain set of circumstances that may or may not apply to humans is grabbed on to and waved about as irrefutable evidence of the efficacy of a certain treatment.

My concern with alternative medicine is its lack of testing and certification. I'm truly concerned that someone will suffer or even die from using alternative medicine. Not necessarily from the "medicine" itself, but perhaps by delaying or avoiding actual proven treatments.

Hey, I'm sure we all agree that if we can cure a disease by snorting a dandelion that we pick for free from our lawn rather than a pricey prescribed message concocted in a lab (oh, the horror!), then we'd pick that option.

People actually HAVE died because of it. Makayla Sault is one example.

I get where people are coming from: I highly dislike the overmedicalization of society. There's a magic pill to cure everything, it's complete nonsense. It's far worse in the United States where doctors are, in some cases, colluding with big pharma to line their pockets.

However, I wouldn't be so quick to judge pharmaceutical companies and doctors if they're prescribing pharmaceuticals but are doing so in an ethical manner. For example, I tried many kinds of medications for asthma. I've tried all sorts of options from Alupent to Prednisone to Salbutamol, you name it I've probably tried it. But I will never forget the worst time of my life was when I wasn't given an inhaler, I was given a Lobelia tincture. My mom felt the other remedies weren't good enough so we went to a homeopathic doctor and he prescribed a Lobelia tincture, basically as a catch all even when I had bronchitis. Lo and behold, year in year out, I would always have the worst bronchitis and asthma of my life when I wasn't routinely taking an inhaler when I got sick. To a point where I felt like I was suffocating in the waiting room. The nurse would put me on an inhaled steroid and I'd be back to normal in 15 minutes. I've never had an experience of this magnitude since going back on inhalers, with the exception of one other time, when I contracted a terrible cough which was due to not receiving a vaccination because, you guessed it, I went to a homeopathic doctor. I've switched doctors and I'm all caught up on my vaccinations now.

For every anecdote I'm sure you can find an anecdote against. This is why anecdotal evidence is largely garbage and I'd rather look at studies that have the greatest good for the greatest amount. I don't understand how the most important thing isn't the utility of that thing rather than defending a standpoint for mostly ideological reasons.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 14, 2015, 04:21:16 PM
I keep bringing it up, because it needs to be discussed, but homeopathy is nuts. Absolute garbage. The whole concept is so deluded in its rationale.

The basic concept is curing with "likeness." Which is somewhat ironic because it's kind of like the idea of vaccination, in a way. Apparently if you add a substance (which to begin with is unlikely to cure you of anything or treat any symptoms) and dilute it numerous times, the water will "remember" the substance and that vigorously shaking (I kid you not) the solution will cause the curing agent to "reenergize" or whatever they call it.

They dilute the solutions so much that the chance of even a single molecule remaining is basically zero. It's the craziest thing I've ever heard. And people eat this up and worse, they buy these homeopathic medicines for stupid amounts of money.

One of the crazy things, homeopathy is a self-regulating medical profession in Ontario! It was just proclaimed in April.

Look at this homeopathic children's cough syrup, for the low price of $12:
https://well.ca/products/hylands-baby-cough-syrup_77609.html?cat=1886

The ingredients have a "6X" or "12X" behind them. This means each ingredient has been diluted to a 1:10 solution 6 times. That's one part per million! or for the 12X, one part per TRILLION!. Anything with a C behind it is a 1/100 solution.

Got the flu? Take Boiron's Oscillococcinum (http://www.boiron.ca/products/ccf/oscillococcinum/). The active ingredients: "Anas Barbariae Hepatis and Cordis extractum 200C". So, these are an extract from duck liver and heart. Diluted to the a solution of 1 to 10^400. I don't even know what the name of that number would be. Take a solution of this duck liver extract and dilute by 1/100; take that solution then dilute it by 1/100 and repeat 200 times.

The price? A low $40 for 30 doses, of which you take three a day! $40 for sugar water.

From Wikipedia: "The greatest dilution reasonably likely to contain even one molecule of the original substance is 12C."
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 14, 2015, 06:11:08 PM
Most alternative medicine is pure fantasy. It's like the saying I've heard a number of times: "do you know what they call effective alternative medicine? Medicine."

Just because this line made me think of it, Tim Minchin's "Storm"

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhGuXCuDb1U[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 04:20:52 AM
An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.

I'll admit I'm not a physician, so my defense of science-based medicine is based purely on what I read as a layperson.

What's your basis for making the claim that it's far superior to other prescribed medicines? And how do you know you're taking the correct dose?


Nattokinase vs Coumadin: benefits, side effects, etc.

http://home.comcast.net/~pobrien48/nattokinase_vrs_coumadin_.htm

How do I know if it works for me or that I am taking the correct dosage?   (My health care physician is an MD with a M.Sc in Biochemistry -- higher than an ordinary naturopath) with an interest in natural medicine.  He has studied both (mainstream & alternative) and is very discerning about many natural products (he has high standards).  If he is unsure about a particular supplement, or it's actual ingredients (if it actually does contain what it's supposed to contain), he won't endorse it. 

Lab tests analysis showcases the efficacy of the products that have been recommended/requisitioned for me.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 04:24:37 AM
Over the past two decades the pharmaceutical industry has moved very far from its original high purpose of discovering and producing useful new drugs.

Now primarily a marketing machine to sell drugs of dubious benefit, this industry uses its wealth and power to co-opt every institution that might stand in its way, including the US Congress, the FDA, academic medical centers, and the medical profession itself. (Most of its marketing efforts are focused on influencing doctors, since they must write the prescriptions.)

From:
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2004/jul/15/the-truth-about-the-drug-companies/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 04:44:36 AM
DP: What is the biggest issue relating to prescription drugs that the mainstream media misses?

MP: Overall, the biggest problem is that the news media is not objective when reporting on medicines. Much of the news coverage on prescription drugs exaggerates their potential benefits and glosses over their risks. Many news stories about new drugs don’t even mention the side effects. People are getting distorted information on prescription drugs. Many of these news stories are little more than press releases that come straight out of the drug companies’ marketing departments.


http://www.alternet.org/story/147318/100,000_americans_die_each_year_from_prescription_drugs,_while_pharma_companies_get_rich
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 05:08:35 AM
Doctors are obliged to improve themselves through continued medical education (CME). Drug companies influence the content of medical education (for example, by giving false product information, by deciding on the venues, speakers, topics, and so on). They also ‘seduce’ doctors with gifts, sponsored meetings (including luxurious dinners, cocktail parties and comfortable overnight stays in top of the bill hotels), high payments for conducting research or publishing reports, etc [60].

Doctors are being enticed into, for example, the twisting of trial results or the groundless creation of data. A study conducted by the FDA has revealed that one in five doctors investigated, who carry out field research of new drugs, had invented the data they sent to the drug companies, and pocketed the fees. Citing case examples, Dr Braithwaite states: ‘The problem is that most fraud in clinical trials is unlikely to even be detected. Most cases which do come to public attention only do so because of extraordinary carelessness by the criminal physician...’

According to Dr Judith Jones, Director of the Division of Drug Experience at the FDA, if the data obtained by a clinician proves unsatisfactory towards the drug being investigated, it is quite in order for the company to continue trials elsewhere until satisfactory results and testimonials are achieved. Unfavourable results are very rarely published and clinicians are pressured into keeping quiet about such data.


http://www.corporatewatch.org/company-profiles/pfizer-inc-corporate-crimes
[/color]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on May 15, 2015, 05:22:32 AM
An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.

I'll admit I'm not a physician, so my defense of science-based medicine is based purely on what I read as a layperson.

What's your basis for making the claim that it's far superior to other prescribed medicines? And how do you know you're taking the correct dose?


Nattokinase vs Coumadin: benefits, side effects, etc.

http://home.comcast.net/~pobrien48/nattokinase_vrs_coumadin_.htm

How do I know if it works for me or that I am taking the correct dosage?   (My health care physician is an MD with a M.Sc in Biochemistry -- higher than an ordinary naturopath) with an interest in natural medicine.  He has studied both (mainstream & alternative) and is very discerning about many natural products (he has high standards).  If he is unsure about a particular supplement, or it's actual ingredients (if it actually does contain what it's supposed to contain), he won't endorse it. 

Lab tests analysis showcases the efficacy of the products that have been recommended/requisitioned for me.

Peer reviewed evidence.  Learn what that is.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 05:25:50 AM
So, How many children has it killed?
Placebo?  Figment of one's imagination?  Feel good stuff?  Nonsense stuff?

No, none of that:

...when you compare the tiny number of injuries inflicted on natural medicine patients compared to the hundreds of thousands of deaths recorded each year due to medical errors.

WHO estimates that one in 10 hospital admissions leads to an adverse event while one in 300 admissions leads to death. WHO puts medical errors as among the top 10 killers in the world. According to the US's Institute of Medicine, preventable medical errors kill 98,000 people in the US alone each year and injure countless more.

One of the group's biggest complaints,...is that natural medicine "doesn't strive to be tested". He says that modern medicine is "totally devoted" to taking an "evidence-based approach" and "do good science and do good research into the things we do to people".

The argument that modern medicine is evidence-based as opposed to other types of medicine is an argument that is often used by medical lobbyists, and tends to be generally accepted by the public. However, according to a report by a panel of experts assembled by the prestigious Institute of Medicine, "well below half" of medical care in the US is based on or supported by adequate evidence.

Natural therapies have been used for more than 10,000 years, and so they deserve a place in society, in Australian universities, and even in modern medicine. According to Australian trauma and general surgeon Dr Valerie Malka, former director of trauma services at Westmead Hospital, while modern medicine is revolutionary when it comes to surgery, particularly in emergencies, for pretty much everything else, traditional, natural or alternative medicine is much more effective.

She says in particular, modern medicine is completely unable to treat or cure chronic illness. Rather than focusing on symptom control, natural medicines work on the body's ability to heal the cause of the illness while modern medicine suppresses the body's healing mechanism with drugs that attack the body's natural defence mechanisms, throwing the immune system out of whack."

...the attack on natural medicine has more to do with the threat to modern medicine's power base as well as its "unhealthy relationship" with the "trillion-dollar pharmaceutical industry".[/This is not the first time natural medicines have been attacked by the medical industry.[/color]

Alternative healthcare professionals such as chiropractors, naturopaths, and midwives have been targeted by the American Medical Association (AMA) for nearly a century, in spite of a federal court injunction against the AMA in 1987 for illegally trying to create a monopoly in the healthcare market.

Up until 1983, the AMA had held that it was unethical for MDs to associate with "unscientific practitioners" and they labelled chiropractic "an unscientific cult". They also had a committee on "quackery" which challenged what it considered to be unscientific forms of healing. Five chiropractors including Chester Wilk sued the AMA, claiming that the committee was established specifically to undermine chiropractic.

Wilk won the case, with Judge Susan Getzendanner ruling that the AMA had engaged in an unlawful conspiracy in restraint of trade "to contain and eliminate the chiropractic profession," also saying that the "AMA had entered into a long history of illegal behaviour".

If you look at the history of attacks on natural healthcare providers over the last 100 years,...attempt to influence the public into believing that natural medicine is, as it says, "quackery" by spreading propaganda that most of the time is simply not true.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-02-21/schwager-war-against-natural-medicine/3840682 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-02-21/schwager-war-against-natural-medicine/3840682)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 05:26:50 AM
An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.

I'll admit I'm not a physician, so my defense of science-based medicine is based purely on what I read as a layperson.

What's your basis for making the claim that it's far superior to other prescribed medicines? And how do you know you're taking the correct dose?


Nattokinase vs Coumadin: benefits, side effects, etc.

http://home.comcast.net/~pobrien48/nattokinase_vrs_coumadin_.htm

How do I know if it works for me or that I am taking the correct dosage?   (My health care physician is an MD with a M.Sc in Biochemistry -- higher than an ordinary naturopath) with an interest in natural medicine.  He has studied both (mainstream & alternative) and is very discerning about many natural products (he has high standards).  If he is unsure about a particular supplement, or it's actual ingredients (if it actually does contain what it's supposed to contain), he won't endorse it. 

Lab tests analysis showcases the efficacy of the products that have been recommended/requisitioned for me.

Peer reviewed evidence.  Learn what that is.


Of course I know what that is.  Where in hell do you think my health physician gets information from?  References that refer the product's efficacy/testing /research etc. by other medical professionals, researchers, studies.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on May 15, 2015, 05:50:58 AM
An excellent professional health product I can attest to.  Far superior to other conventional anti-clotting blood-thinning medications with all their due complications.

I'll admit I'm not a physician, so my defense of science-based medicine is based purely on what I read as a layperson.

What's your basis for making the claim that it's far superior to other prescribed medicines? And how do you know you're taking the correct dose?


Nattokinase vs Coumadin: benefits, side effects, etc.

http://home.comcast.net/~pobrien48/nattokinase_vrs_coumadin_.htm

How do I know if it works for me or that I am taking the correct dosage?   (My health care physician is an MD with a M.Sc in Biochemistry -- higher than an ordinary naturopath) with an interest in natural medicine.  He has studied both (mainstream & alternative) and is very discerning about many natural products (he has high standards).  If he is unsure about a particular supplement, or it's actual ingredients (if it actually does contain what it's supposed to contain), he won't endorse it. 

Lab tests analysis showcases the efficacy of the products that have been recommended/requisitioned for me.

Peer reviewed evidence.  Learn what that is.


Of course I know what that is.  Where in hell do you think my health physician gets information from?  References that refer the product's efficacy/testing /research etc. by other medical professionals, researchers, studies.

You post the equivalent of geocities pages.  The reason Nattokinase got pulled off the shelves is that anticoagulant therapies require clinical trials testing for efficacy in humans.  If there was data to actually support the use of Nattokinase for actual stroke prevention it wouldn't have been removed from the shelves.  Primary level studies aren't the equivalent of RCTs.  And natto as a product itself is not the direct equivalent to natto supplementation.  But hey, Coumadin is rat poison just mushed into pill form because it sounds scarier that way.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 15, 2015, 07:06:19 AM
Well, I don't know about you guys but individual bits of nonsense are wholly ineffective on me. But if someone posts piece of nonsense after piece of nonsense in an attempt to bludgeon the conversation to death with links to things that aren't in any way scientific, I'm certainly convinced.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bill_Berg on May 15, 2015, 07:33:43 AM
Well, I don't know about you guys but individual bits of nonsense are wholly ineffective on me. But if someone posts piece of nonsense after piece of nonsense in an attempt to bludgeon the conversation to death with links to things that aren't in any way scientific, I'm certainly convinced.

It was all the exclamation marks that sold me.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 02:08:23 PM
So,  what you're all trying to say is that if something is actually proven to work and if it is natural, it's largely bunk.  If one cannot have it tested as one would a drug, it's bunk.  Studies, evaluations, etc, don't count in the least bit.  I, see.

I can see the bias on this board is very one-sided.  It is fruitless trying to a least present a balanced, fair viewpoint.  Fine.  I could care less about your opinions.  I don't need them.  There is plenty out there that attests to the efficacy and potential benefits of natural supplements.  What's the point of posting anything even from a scientific study when excuses are going to be made.

According to  Charles Weijer:
At Western University’s Rotman Institute of Philosophy, Charles Weijer sees opposition to science often, and says it’s not new, just more widespread.

“This skepticism finds root in a broader, actually long-standing, ambivalence that we have about science and technological progress,” says Weijer, a bioethics expert who holds a Canada Research Chair.

On one hand, science brings hope. But the side-effects? We’re not so sure.

Science rests on trust, on the belief that earlier scientists have laid a foundation for new work, but “there have been a lot of real events that breed mistrust in the reports of scientists.”

Mad-cow disease, where the British government played down risks until people became sick. Stem cells studies with faked data. Advertisers with an influence over research journals. Drug companies hiding results of trials that go badly. And even governments muzzling their scientists.

“None of this is made up. These are all actual things, and these give people reason to ask themselves: Can I believe in what I am being told by scientists?” says Weijer.


http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/why-dont-people-trust-science
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 15, 2015, 02:37:02 PM

From the cmaj.ca (Dec. 1997):

Dr. Charles Weijer, a general practitdoner turned bioethicist Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, says the best way to assess
complementary therapies is to stop trying to measure biologic effect.  Instead, researchers should a package of outcomes such as symptom improvements, pain control, and control over nausea and vomiting,   "Some treatments...lend then selves well to study", he says .  But with alternative medicine, the outcomes are holistic and diffuse.  It is much more difficult to measure holistic well-being."

Dr. Eric Meslin, former bioethicist Sunnybrook Hospital:
The question of what constitutes valid scientific evidence remains One of the biggest barriers in the battle for mainstream acceptance of complementary therapies.  However, Meslin says the argument that complementary therapies have not been validated "is not a strong one."

He says many mainstream treatments, both medical and surgical, have never beenvalidated by standard studies either.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: bustaheims on May 15, 2015, 02:43:57 PM
So,  what you're all trying to say is that if something is actually proven to work and if it is natural, it's largely bunk.  If one cannot have it tested as one would a drug, it's bunk.  Studies, evaluations, etc, don't count in the least bit.  I, see.

No, what we're saying is what you're presenting aren't things that have actually been proven to work. They are capable of being tested like drugs, and, when they have been, they have - for the most part - failed those tests. Presenting biased "studies" and "evaluations" aren't going to help your point, because they're so blatantly biased. They're basically people saying "it works because I believe it works and I know people who have used it who have seen improvement - even though that improvement cannot be directly tied to the usage of whatever remedy I'm supporting."
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bender on May 15, 2015, 04:05:43 PM
So,  what you're all trying to say is that if something is actually proven to work and if it is natural, it's largely bunk.  If one cannot have it tested as one would a drug, it's bunk.  Studies, evaluations, etc, don't count in the least bit.  I, see.

No, what we're saying is what you're presenting aren't things that have actually been proven to work. They are capable of being tested like drugs, and, when they have been, they have - for the most part - failed those tests. Presenting biased "studies" and "evaluations" aren't going to help your point, because they're so blatantly biased. They're basically people saying "it works because I believe it works and I know people who have used it who have seen improvement - even though that improvement cannot be directly tied to the usage of whatever remedy I'm supporting."

It's also completely unfair. For example, Aspirin is essentially a highly concentrated form of a natural remedy that was known to work. That's why we made aspirin. Chicken broth is widely known to aid in decongestion, that's why people still have chicken broth when they're sick. But just because it's natural doesn't mean it will work, let alone good for you! People complain all the time about artificial sweeteners but it's far easier to ingest too much sugar than it is to ingest artificial sweeteners before you suffer ill effects.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 15, 2015, 11:29:17 PM
I'm really starting to question the quality of the medical care I'd receive at Alpha Moonbase.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 15, 2015, 11:54:50 PM
I'm really starting to question the quality of the medical care I'd receive at Alpha Moonbase.

"Take two molecules of Cordis extractum and call me in the morning."
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 16, 2015, 12:19:28 AM
I'm really starting to question the quality of the medical care I'd receive at Alpha Moonbase.


That,  my dearest Nik, is pure fsntasy.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 16, 2015, 12:22:29 AM
So,  what you're all trying to say is that if something is actually proven to work and if it is natural, it's largely bunk.  If one cannot have it tested as one would a drug, it's bunk.  Studies, evaluations, etc, don't count in the least bit.  I, see.

No, what we're saying is what you're presenting aren't things that have actually been proven to work. They are capable of being tested like drugs, and, when they have been, they have - for the most part - failed those tests. Presenting biased "studies" and "evaluations" aren't going to help your point, because they're so blatantly biased. They're basically people saying "it works because I believe it works and I know people who have used it who have seen improvement - even though that improvement cannot be directly tied to the usage of whatever remedy I'm supporting."

It's also completely unfair. For example, Aspirin is essentially a highly concentrated form of a natural remedy that was known to work. That's why we made aspirin. Chicken broth is widely known to aid in decongestion, that's why people still have chicken broth when they're sick. But just because it's natural doesn't mean it will work, let alone good for you! People complain all the time about artificial sweeteners but it's far easier to ingest too much sugar than it is to ingest artificial sweeteners before you suffer ill effects.


Truth is, neither artificial sweeteners nor too much sugar is good for you.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 16, 2015, 08:36:49 AM
I'm really starting to question the quality of the medical care I'd receive at Alpha Moonbase.


That,  my dearest Nik, is pure fsntasy.

Lost opportunity to say science fiction instead.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on May 16, 2015, 08:47:53 AM
I'm really starting to question the quality of the medical care I'd receive at Alpha Moonbase.


That,  my dearest Nik, is pure fsntasy.

Lost opportunity to say science fiction instead.

Lost opportunity to say fantasy too.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on May 17, 2015, 01:56:50 AM
[youtube]97N18BTyj4w[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Heroic Shrimp on May 17, 2015, 11:25:03 AM
[youtube]97N18BTyj4w[/youtube]

While I take the sincerity of the maker of that video at face value, if somebody told me that that was made as a comedy video to parody what appeals intellectually to some people when it comes to health care, I would 100% believe them.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 17, 2015, 01:36:10 PM
I stopped watching once I noticed "Story by Mike Adams" in the corner. That man is dangerous.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on June 08, 2015, 08:41:42 AM
The way medicine should be...the integrative approach:

A new study has shed light on how cancer patients' attitudes and beliefs drive the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help hospitals develop more effective and accessible integrative oncology services for patients.

...patients who were younger, those who were female, and those who had a college education tended to expect greater benefits from complementary and alternative medicine....Attitudes and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine were much more likely to affect patients' use than clinical and demographic characteristics.

"We found that specific attitudes and beliefs -- such as expectation of therapeutic benefits, patient-perceived barriers regarding cost and access, and opinions of patients' physician and family members -- may predict patients' use of complementary and alternative medicine following cancer diagnoses," said Dr. Mao. "We also found that these beliefs and attitudes varied by key socio-demographic factors such as sex, race, and education, which highlights the need for a more individualized approach when clinically integrating complementary and alternative medicine into conventional cancer care.

...therapies such as acupuncture and yoga continue to demonstrate clinical benefits for reducing pain, fatigue, and psychological distress, the field of integrative oncology is emerging to bring complementary and alternative medicine together with conventional care to improve patient outcomes.

"Our findings emphasize the importance of patients' attitudes and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine as we seek to develop integrative oncology programs in academic medical centers and community hospitals," said Dr. Bauml.

Read article here:

http://www.lef.org/news/lefdailynews?NewsID=23918&Section=Disease
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Nik the Trik on June 08, 2015, 08:52:53 AM

The placebo effect doesn't change the efficacy of sugar pills.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on June 08, 2015, 10:20:52 AM
There have been other studies on the topic but I like this one because it was pretty simple and straightforward.  It also comes from PLoS so it's online and free access to the actual study.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Frank E on June 08, 2015, 10:58:06 AM
There have been other studies on the topic but I like this one because it was pretty simple and straightforward.  It also comes from PLoS so it's online and free access to the actual study.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591)

LK, are you aware of studies like these for acupuncture?  My wife swears it helps, and I keep telling her she's just getting a placebo effect from it.
 
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on June 08, 2015, 11:28:19 AM
There have been other studies on the topic but I like this one because it was pretty simple and straightforward.  It also comes from PLoS so it's online and free access to the actual study.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591)

LK, are you aware of studies like these for acupuncture?  My wife swears it helps, and I keep telling her she's just getting a placebo effect from it.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0356 (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0356)
http://www.dcscience.net/Colquhoun-Novella-A&A-2013.pdf (http://www.dcscience.net/Colquhoun-Novella-A&A-2013.pdf)
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0067485 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0067485)

The thought process behind is potentially a bit of both.   There is some pretty convincing evidence that for a lot of indications that any benefit is almost surely placebo effect.  There is another line of thinking that there may be a small amount of benefit from pressure point therapy.  There is another thought process that what accupuncture is doing is relieving muscle cramp and that subjective benefit is appropriated to the actual underlying condition.  It's sort of an effect where you have gastroenteritis and are nauseous and vomiting.  You develop a headache from all of the wretching and I give you a Tylenol.  It makes your headache better and now you perceive that over overall illness is also better.  The Tylenol did absolutely nothing to resolve your nausea, vomiting and diarrhea but you subjectively feel better and therefore attribute that the Tylenol helps you.

When I get into discussions on alternative treatments I really leave it up to a if you have the money AND you feel like it gives you benefit AND I know that it isn't actually causing harm (like telling someone to stop chemo and take cesium and potassium supplements at an exhorbitant personal cost to treat lung cancer).
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Frank E on June 08, 2015, 12:51:53 PM
There have been other studies on the topic but I like this one because it was pretty simple and straightforward.  It also comes from PLoS so it's online and free access to the actual study.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015591)

LK, are you aware of studies like these for acupuncture?  My wife swears it helps, and I keep telling her she's just getting a placebo effect from it.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0356 (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2008.0356)
http://www.dcscience.net/Colquhoun-Novella-A&A-2013.pdf (http://www.dcscience.net/Colquhoun-Novella-A&A-2013.pdf)
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0067485 (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0067485)

The thought process behind is potentially a bit of both.   There is some pretty convincing evidence that for a lot of indications that any benefit is almost surely placebo effect.  There is another line of thinking that there may be a small amount of benefit from pressure point therapy.  There is another thought process that what accupuncture is doing is relieving muscle cramp and that subjective benefit is appropriated to the actual underlying condition.  It's sort of an effect where you have gastroenteritis and are nauseous and vomiting.  You develop a headache from all of the wretching and I give you a Tylenol.  It makes your headache better and now you perceive that over overall illness is also better.  The Tylenol did absolutely nothing to resolve your nausea, vomiting and diarrhea but you subjectively feel better and therefore attribute that the Tylenol helps you.

When I get into discussions on alternative treatments I really leave it up to a if you have the money AND you feel like it gives you benefit AND I know that it isn't actually causing harm (like telling someone to stop chemo and take cesium and potassium supplements at an exhorbitant personal cost to treat lung cancer).

Thanks man.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on June 08, 2015, 07:11:38 PM
A good summary of an argument against acupuncture actually doing anything:
https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/acupuncture-doesnt-work/ by Steven Novella and David Colquhoun

and a huge collection of resources on why it doesn't work:
https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/reference/acupuncture/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on June 14, 2015, 11:34:40 PM
Science News: A Rendezvous with Pluto (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/rendezvous-pluto)

Just amazing what the human race has been able to accomplish.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Stickytape on June 15, 2015, 09:38:45 AM
Science News: A Rendezvous with Pluto (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/rendezvous-pluto)

Just amazing what the human race has been able to accomplish.

It's especially amazing when you realize how recent these feats are in human history. We've barely had functioning airplanes for a century and now we have a robot doing lab work for us on Mars, probes landing on comets, and a permanently manned space station.  Blows my mind.

It's too bad New Horizons can't also swing by Eris (and its moon), but I guess it's pretty far out of its way, on the other side of the system, and won't be back for another couple centuries or so.  Hurry home, Eris, I don't think I'm going to make it to 2250.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on July 01, 2015, 04:52:08 AM
Helium found leaking in the Newport-Inglewood fault mantle, far more than that found in the San Andreas fault:

A huge fault in the Earth's crust near Los Angeles is leaking helium, researchers have found.

They say the unexpected find sheds new light on the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone in the Los Angeles Basin.

It reveals the fault is far deeper than previously thought, and a quake would be far more devastating.

UC Santa Barbara geologist Jim Boles found evidence of helium leakage from the Earth's mantle along a 30-mile stretch of the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone in the Los Angeles Basin.

He claims the results show that the Newport-Inglewood fault is deeper than scientists previously thought.

...Boles discovered that more than one-third of the sites show evidence of high levels of helium-3 (3He).
'The results are unexpected for the area, because the LA Basin is different from where most mantle helium anomalies occur,' said Boles, professor emeritus in UCSB's Department of Earth Science.

'The Newport-Inglewood fault appears to sit on a 30-million-year-old subduction zone, so it is surprising that it maintains a significant pathway through the crust.'

...they found that high levels of 3He inversely correlate with carbon dioxide (CO2), which Boles noted acts as a carrier gas for 3He.
An analysis showed that the CO2 was also from the mantle, confirming leakage from deep inside the Earth.

'This paper shows that the mantle is leaking more at the Newport-Inglewood fault zone than at the San Andreas Fault, which is a new discovery.'

'We show that the Newport-Inglewood fault is not only deep-seated but also directly or indirectly connected with the mantle,' Boles said.

'We are fortunate that seismic activity in California has been relatively low over the past century,' said Tom Jordan, Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center and a co-author of the study.
'But we know that tectonic forces are continually tightening the springs of the San Andreas fault system, making big quakes inevitable.

...the estimate for the likelihood that California will experience a magnitude 8 or larger earthquake in the next 30 years has increased from about 4.7% for UCERF2 to about 7.0% for UCERF3.

The UCERF3 model is of the first kind, and is the latest earthquake-rupture forecast for California. It was developed and reviewed by dozens of leading scientific experts from the fields of seismology, geology, geodesy, paleoseismology, earthquake physics and earthquake engineering.

Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3143818/Helium-LEAKING-massive-earthquake-fault-LA-raising-fears-big-one-devastating-thought.html
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 11, 2015, 01:51:34 AM
The Universe "is slowly dying."  (Don't worry it's not the end of the world),

Goodbye, universe. You came in with the biggest bang ever, but now, you're on your way out with a drooping fizzle.

The conclusion of a new astronomical study pulls no punches on this. "The Universe is slowly dying," it reads.

Astronomers have believed as much for years, but the new findings establish the cosmos' decline with unprecedented precision.

An international team of some 100 scientists used data from the world's most powerful telescopes -- based on land and in space -- to study energy coming from more than 200,000 galaxies in a large sliver of the observable universe.

Based on those observations, they have confirmed the cosmos is radiating only half as much energy as it was 2 billion years ago. The astronomers published their study on Monday on the website of the European Southern Observatory.

Read on:
http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/10/us/universe-dying/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on August 14, 2015, 03:02:00 AM
Shade balls help preserve California's water reservoirs:

[youtube]mEmwJzQjwyw[/youtube]


https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/california-is-using-shade-balls-to-fight-193546538.html (https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/california-is-using-shade-balls-to-fight-193546538.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on August 14, 2015, 10:36:12 AM
Speaking of shade balls:

http://kaplifestyle.com/blog/2015/08/13/au-naturel/
Quote
If you want to be your strongest, get some sun on your boys. And by boys, I mean your testicles.

Baseball players are continually trying to mine every (legal) advantage they can. Any pro athlete is working to get stronger, faster, more powerful, and they’re looking to their nutrition, supplements, even superstitions to do so.

There’s a running joke in baseball clubhouses about eating bananas.

Player A (eating a banana): Know why I like to eat bananas?

Player B: Why?

Player A: Ever see a weak gorilla?

Maybe it isn’t about the bananas. Rather, perhaps the gorillas have elevated testosterone because they don’t wear clothes. Fine, this may be a stretch, but hear me out.

We’ve often mused on the value of vitamin D and getting it through some carefully calculated exposure to the sun. Even a baseball player, out in the sun daily, is usually mostly covered in long pants, a shirt, a hat and slathered in sunscreen. We get less vitamin D than we think.

The science is questionable, but the lede does not want to be buried on this one.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: brothert on August 15, 2015, 10:14:23 PM
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150812-can-rationing-save-the-world

read this article today about current consumption rates and how the world has consumed the yearly production of the earth by august 15.  it raises some very worrying thoughts about what the future may bring.  i just dont see people sitting idly starving to death. can governments actually develop a unified direction on how to get the worlds population under control. obviously there are alot of variables and its complex. what sacrifices are going to be made. i think doing nothing is the worst idea but not sure what direction we should be taking. that said the last 20 years has been frustration as we know there is a problem but there's been alot of denial about the situation. i dont want to see a genocide type of answer to this problem but if i have thought it people with alot less moral reservation have been thinking about it too
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Dappleganger on August 16, 2015, 11:56:56 AM
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150812-can-rationing-save-the-world

read this article today about current consumption rates and how the world has consumed the yearly production of the earth by august 15.  it raises some very worrying thoughts about what the future may bring.  i just dont see people sitting idly starving to death. can governments actually develop a unified direction on how to get the worlds population under control. obviously there are alot of variables and its complex. what sacrifices are going to be made. i think doing nothing is the worst idea but not sure what direction we should be taking. that said the last 20 years has been frustration as we know there is a problem but there's been alot of denial about the situation. i dont want to see a genocide type of answer to this problem but if i have thought it people with alot less moral reservation have been thinking about it too

This problems could be rectified if Nations shifted there focus and money from Military endavours to saving the planet. Hopefully the time will come. It might take some very scary things to happen first but we will get there.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: L K on August 18, 2015, 05:06:56 PM
It's science sort of, but I'm looking forward to the robot battle between the US company Megabots and the Japanese Kurata robot.


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVJTGLL2SnI[/youtube]
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7u8mheM2Hrg[/youtube]
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXtMgGCh2aI[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on September 10, 2015, 02:11:03 PM
A submerged monolith in the Sicilian Channel (central Mediterranean Sea): Evidence for Mesolithic human activity (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352409X15300535)

Quote
Highlights

• A submerged, 12 m long monolith has been discovered at a water depth of 40 m, in a shallow bank of the Sicilian Channel.

• Morphological evidence, underwater observations, and results of petrographic analysis testify that the monolith is man-made.

• This monolith suggests a significant human activity in the Pantelleria Vecchia Bank, a former island of the Sicilian Channel.

• Seawater inundated the Pantelleria Vecchia Bank at 9350 ± 200 yr B.P., presumably forcing inhabitants to migrate.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on September 11, 2015, 08:12:08 AM
http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-species-human-discovered-south-africa

Quote
This incredible fossil find comes from the richest single hominin assemblage so far discovered in Africa. A gift that keeps on giving, the species not only enlightens us on the origins and diversity of man, but also seems to display a behavior long believed to be unique to humans, even perhaps a defining feature of our species: deliberately disposing of its dead in an isolated chamber.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 11, 2015, 10:41:04 AM
Does smoking shorten lifespans?  Yes and no...according to a study that appeared in The Journals of Gerontology, Biological and Medical Sciences:

Not all smokers experience early mortality, however, and a small proportion manage to survive to extreme ages.

Using long-lived smokers as their phenotype, the authors identified a network of SNPs (a DNA sequence variation occurring commonly within a population) that allow certain individuals to better withstand environmental damage (like smoking) and mitigate damage. Collectively, these SNPs were strongly associated with high survival rates.

...they identified a set of genetic markers that together seem to promote longevity and many of these markers are in pathways that were discovered to be important for aging and lifespan in animal models.

...there is evidence that these genes may facilitate lifespan extension by increasing cellular maintenance and repair.
Therefore, even though some individuals are exposed to high levels of biological stressors, like those found in cigarette smoke, their bodies may be better set up to cope with and repair the damage.

These findings suggest that longevity, rather than being entirely determined by environmental factors, may be under the regulation of complex genetic networks which influence stress resistance and genomic stability.

http://www.lifeextension.com/news/lefdailynews?NewsID=24288&Section=Aging
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 27, 2015, 07:26:41 PM
Red moon rising...get ready for a "Supermoon":

It won't happen again until 2033.  Starting late tonight and lasting approximately 72 minutes, a Supermodn will be in effect -- that is, when a total lunar eclipse takes effect and the moon appears red -- due to it's close proximity to earth.

http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com//news/world/supermoon-eclipse-sunday
.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on October 27, 2015, 08:25:00 PM
Sonic Tractor Beams Are Now A Reality  (http://www.iflscience.com/sonic-tractor-beams-are-now-reality)

Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Sussex, England in collaboration with Ultrahaptics have developed the first sonic tractor beam that can lift and move objects using nothing but sound waves.

The team used a system made of 64 miniature loudspeakers able to create high-pitched and high-intensity sound waves, generating an acoustic hologram that can lift, move, rotate and hold small objects. The system can create three different shapes of acoustic force fields. The first was made to resemble tweezers, the second was a vortex-like structure which trapped the object in the middle, and the last one surrounds the object from all directions and keeps it in place.

This new technology presents the opportunity for far-reaching applications: from mechanical support moving and assembling delicate objects, to medical aid where miniaturized beams could guide drugs through living tissue.

Original publication (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/151027/ncomms9661/full/ncomms9661.html)

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on October 28, 2015, 07:43:29 AM
Sonic Tractor Beams Are Now A Reality  (http://www.iflscience.com/sonic-tractor-beams-are-now-reality)

Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Sussex, England in collaboration with Ultrahaptics have developed the first sonic tractor beam that can lift and move objects using nothing but sound waves.

The team used a system made of 64 miniature loudspeakers able to create high-pitched and high-intensity sound waves, generating an acoustic hologram that can lift, move, rotate and hold small objects. The system can create three different shapes of acoustic force fields. The first was made to resemble tweezers, the second was a vortex-like structure which trapped the object in the middle, and the last one surrounds the object from all directions and keeps it in place.

This new technology presents the opportunity for far-reaching applications: from mechanical support moving and assembling delicate objects, to medical aid where miniaturized beams could guide drugs through living tissue.

Original publication (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/151027/ncomms9661/full/ncomms9661.html)



That one sounds both amazing and advanced.  God knows how much this will help in that category alone medical-wise, but nevertheless it will eventually be an incredible breakthrough.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on November 27, 2015, 12:19:11 PM
Water Bear DNA sequence complete, they are even stranger than thought... (http://www.sciencealert.com/the-tardigrade-genome-has-been-sequenced-and-it-has-the-most-foreign-dna-of-any-animal)

Quote
the microscopic water creature grows to just over 1 mm on average, and is the only animal that can survive in the harsh environment of space. It can also withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, can cope with ridiculous amounts of pressure and radiation, and can live for more than 10 years without food or water. Basically, it's nearly impossible to kill, and now scientists have shown that its DNA is just as bizarre as it is.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on November 27, 2015, 01:13:17 PM
Water Bear DNA sequence complete, they are even stranger than thought... (http://www.sciencealert.com/the-tardigrade-genome-has-been-sequenced-and-it-has-the-most-foreign-dna-of-any-animal)

Quote
the microscopic water creature grows to just over 1 mm on average, and is the only animal that can survive in the harsh environment of space. It can also withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, can cope with ridiculous amounts of pressure and radiation, and can live for more than 10 years without food or water. Basically, it's nearly impossible to kill, and now scientists have shown that its DNA is just as bizarre as it is.

All tardigrade mentions need to be accompanied by The Gif.
(http://www.sciencealert.com/images/Osos_de_Agua_puede_sobrevivir_sin_comida_ni_agua_durante_m_s_de_una_d_cada3wodo1_400.gif)
It is known.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on November 27, 2015, 01:35:24 PM
 ;D
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on November 27, 2015, 02:18:38 PM
That's so creepy.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on November 27, 2015, 04:10:03 PM
It reminds me a lot of the Sea Pig.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_y4DbZivHCY[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: CarltonTheBear on November 27, 2015, 04:18:12 PM
Nope.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on November 27, 2015, 04:26:53 PM
Awesome, aside from the crapping out of the lungs and stuff, they're almost identical...
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on November 27, 2015, 04:42:29 PM
As you can see, they are virtually identical.

Speaking of nigh indestructible animals (and zefrank videos):
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHi9FvUPSdQ[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on December 04, 2015, 11:23:15 PM
The Project Apollo Archive (https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectapolloarchive/) is kind of fun, almost 12,000 photos from the Apollo missions. Hopefully this takes the wind out of the moon landing hoax crowd.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on January 13, 2016, 03:07:27 PM
Thought controlled prosthetic limb (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2015-11-12/meet-the-man-with-a-thought-controlled-robotic-arm)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on February 20, 2016, 03:02:14 PM
Scientists make first direct detection of gravitational waves (http://news.mit.edu/2016/ligo-first-detection-gravitational-waves-0211)

Quote
Now for the first time, scientists in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration — with a prominent role played by researchers at MIT and Caltech — have directly observed the ripples of gravitational waves in an instrument on Earth. In so doing, they have again dramatically confirmed Einstein’s theory of general relativity and opened up a new way in which to view the universe.

But there’s more: The scientists have also decoded the gravitational wave signal and determined its source. According to their calculations, the gravitational wave is the product of a collision between two massive black holes, 1.3 billion light years away — a remarkably extreme event that has not been observed until now.

[youtube]B4XzLDM3Py8[/youtube]

[youtube]Zt8Z_uzG71o[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on February 20, 2016, 06:38:53 PM
That is amazing!  Einstein would have definitely been proud.

One science writer once oommented that he thought that black holes ("the black monoliths") were gateways to anolher dimension.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on February 20, 2016, 06:40:24 PM
More details on the LIGO project:

https://www.black-holes.org/
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 09, 2016, 12:09:58 PM
Black hole as massive as 17 billion suns surprises astronomers (http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/supermassive-black-hole-1.3524833)

Quote
"We were surprised that the black hole in NGC 1600 is 10 times more massive than predicted by the mass of the galaxy," said Jens Thomas, an astronomer with the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and the lead author of a new paper in Nature describing the discovery.

The position of the stars surrounding the black hole suggested it was once a pair of black holes that later merged.

The discovery may mean that the mass of extremely massive black holes may not be related to the mass of the stars near the centre of their host galaxy, and there may be far more monster black holes in the universe than astronomers had expected, in other small galaxy clusters.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on April 14, 2016, 03:11:58 PM
The Solar System to scale.

http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/417309/our-place-in-the-universe/?utm_source=SFFB
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on April 14, 2016, 03:43:40 PM
The Solar System to scale.

http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/417309/our-place-in-the-universe/?utm_source=SFFB

Obligatory:
(http://1.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com/50/27/0d41808f60af8871fa122b3b0f37ab1b.gif)

What a beautifully shot video about a beautiful topic.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on April 14, 2016, 04:40:13 PM
In space, there's just so much.........space.

My mind can't comprehend the size of the universe. The fact that there's billions of billions of solar systems in our galaxy and there's billions of billions of galaxies. ya, your gif shows how i feel.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on April 14, 2016, 05:08:35 PM
In space, there's just so much.........space.

My mind can't comprehend the size of the universe. The fact that there's billions of billions of solar systems in our galaxy and there's billions of billions of galaxies. ya, your gif shows how i feel.

Oh, then you're sure to enjoy this:
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rENyyRwxpHo[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on April 16, 2016, 12:43:41 AM
That's a great vid froggy, I had this map from National Geographic as a kid...

(http://designarchives.aiga.org/assets/images/000/018/450/18450_or.jpg)

The smallest graphic is of the inside of our solar system, at the bottom of the pic, each triangle 'up' leads to a position showing incredible distance relationships. We are so very small, less than a spec of sand on the beach.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: TheMightyOdin on April 17, 2016, 11:02:37 PM
I had the good fortune of seeing Neil Degrase Tyson in Toronto earlier this year. He spoke about Ligo and the gravitational wave measurment. It was fascinating.

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on May 26, 2016, 12:24:40 PM
Neanderthals Built Mystery Cave Rings 175,000 Years Ago (http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/a21023/neanderthals-built-mystery-cave-rings-175000-years-ago/)

Quote
They painted magnificent cave paintings. They mastered fire and used tools. And now we know they constructed complex buildings deep within subterranean caves, and they did it more than 175,000 years ago. No, we're not talking about early humans. Neanderthals did all this.

A team of archaeologists led by Jacques Jaubert at the University of Bordeaux in France has just completed an archaeological examination of a mysterious find: the rubble of two ancient Neanderthal-made buildings meticulously crafted from stalagmites. The site is located 1,000 feet into a dark, twisting cave 30 miles outside what is now Toulouse in southwestern France. The discovery is the first of its kind and, the researchers say, radically alters the understanding of Neanderthal culture. Jaubert's team outlines their exploration today in a paper in the journal Nature.
 

(http://pop.h-cdn.co/assets/16/21/980x490/landscape-1464193985-rings1.jpg)

This article (http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/05/the-astonishing-age-of-a-neanderthal-cave-construction-site/484070/) has some interesting back story.

Quote
Recognizing the site’s value, the caver brought in archaeologist Francois Rouzaud. Using carbon-dating, Rouzaud estimated that a burnt bear bone found within the chamber was 47,600 years old, which meant that the stalagmite rings were older than any known cave painting. It also meant that they couldn’t have been the work of Homo sapiens. Their builders must have been the only early humans in the south of France at the time: Neanderthals.

The discovery suggested that Neanderthals were more sophisticated than anyone had given them credit for. They wielded fire, ventured deep underground, and shaped the subterranean rock into complex constructions. Perhaps they even carried out rituals; after all, there was no evidence that anyone actually lived in the cave, so what else were the rings and mounds for? 

Rouzaud would never know. In April 1999, while guiding colleagues through a different cave, he suffered a fatal heart attack. With his death, work on the Bruniquel Cave ceased, and its incredible contents were neglected. They’ve only now re-entered the limelight because Sophie Verheyden went on holiday.

A life-long caver, Verheyden works at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, where she specializes in stalagmites. She treats them as time capsules, using the chemicals within them to reconstruct the climate of past millennia. So when she learned about Bruniquel Cave, while visiting the region on holiday and seeing a display at a nearby castle, she had only one thought: Why hadn’t anyone dated the broken stalagmites themselves?”
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Tigger on August 09, 2016, 02:29:03 PM
Cornell scientists convert carbon dioxide, create electricity

“Carbon capture” technologies – chemically trapping carbon dioxide before it is released into the atmosphere – is one approach. In a recent study, Cornell University researchers disclose a novel method for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to a useful product – while producing electrical energy.

Lynden Archer, the James A. Friend Family Distinguished Professor of Engineering, and doctoral student Wajdi Al Sadat have developed an oxygen-assisted aluminum/carbon dioxide power cell that uses electrochemical reactions to both sequester the carbon dioxide and produce electricity (http://mediarelations.cornell.edu/2016/08/04/cornell-scientists-convert-carbon-dioxide-create-electricity/)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 01, 2016, 10:31:03 AM
Just when they thought they had something...but...no alien signal...

The team of scientists manning a huge radio telescope high in the Caucasus region have said that the signal they believed at first to have originated from distant star HD164595 was most likely the result of “terrestrial interference”.

The Ratan-600, a telescope located in Zelenchukskaya in the Caucasus mountains straddling Europe and Asia, surveys as much of the sky as possible for signals of possible interest. Last year, the team told a group of fellow astronomers in Moscow it believed the telescope intercepted a “candidate signal” worthy of further monitoring.

Unfortunately, though the information took a year to reach the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (Seti) community in the rest of the world, the astronomers from Moscow State University and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), further scrutiny turned out to be necessary: “Subsequent processing and analysis of the signal revealed its most probable terrestrial origin,” wrote Yulia Sotnikova of the RAS.


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/aug/31/ratan-600-telescope-russia-extratrerrestrial-aliens-space
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on September 01, 2016, 10:48:21 AM
Cyborg calling!  Memory Prosthetic Implantation:

...what in god's good earth is a memory prosthetic?...this is a first of its kind device, potentially as revolutionary as the Xerox machine. And the comparison goes one step further, because like a Xerox machine, the purpose of the memory prosthetic is to create a facsimile of the impressions fed into it, albeit one stored in long term memory rather than on paper. How it goes about this complicated task is where the story gets interesting.

A basic understanding of how the brain goes about storing information in long term memory will prove helpful at this point. While certain details of this process remain sketchy even unto neuroscientists, the basic working of this has been discovered to the degree that we can now intervene at important junctures with a purpose of aiding or inhibiting the final outcome. In this case, the brain component involved in the conversion of short term declarative memories such as names and faces, into long term memories, is the hippocampus. When the hippocampus is injured, or in some other way degraded, the neuronal signals it receives from the short term memory fail to get converted into long term memories.

Enter the brain prosthetic. Using a computer generated model, Ted Berger and the fellow researchers at UCLA who went on to launch Kernel, were able to map patterns of neuronal firing that the hippocampus uses to convert short term memories into long term ones. Having worked out the equations that could approximate the output given by the hippocampus, it was only a small leap to load these models onto a computer chip which could be embedded in the human brain and take the place of an injured or missing hippocampus. This is off course a gross exaggeration, since anytime an artificial, electronic device is squeezed into the delicate tissue of the human brain, numerous complications arise. However, these have all been sorted out to the degree that the FDA has cleared the device for clinical trials in humans - a not insignificant accomplishment in itself given the rigorous and stringent guidelines involved in human trials.

More:
http://www.lifeextension.com/news/lefdailynews?NewsID=25676&Section=Aging (http://www.lifeextension.com/news/lefdailynews?NewsID=25676&Section=Aging)


Six Million Dollar, Bionic Woman, we await you!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on January 15, 2017, 05:01:39 AM
"Negative Differential Resistance" or NDR.  What it is and how a group of Canadian physicists & scientists finally solved the puzzle:

A team of University of Alberta physicists has deciphered a scientific mystery that evaded computer whizzes for decades, resulting in a discovery potentially worth billions of dollars to the technology industry.

His study sought to control a seemingly uncontrollable electrical phenomenon known as negative differential resistance (NDR).

“The simplest way to think about it is … electricity behaving backwards,” Wolkow said, likening the process to water being pushed through a hose whereby increasing the pressure forces the water to move faster. Electricity acts in a similar way, he said, but instead of pressure, it’s voltage that increases the flow of the current.

“The really weird thing is in some rare cases … you push harder, and the current goes slower instead of faster.”

Wolkow’s team was able to determine the exact atomic structure that creates NDR. He said the potential monetary value of a hybrid transistor or NDR circuit has been well-established for decades, but no one understood how to control the effect.

The discovery could lead to building smaller, cheaper and faster computers...

Read more:
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/its-perhaps-the-most-beautiful-paper-of-my-whole-life-u-of-a-researchers-solve-puzzle-that-baffled-scientists-for-decades

Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on February 21, 2017, 03:10:31 PM
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-24835822

Peak Child is here!
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on February 22, 2017, 01:36:35 PM
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnKFaAS30X8[/youtube]
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Stebro on April 04, 2017, 01:09:45 PM
Are there people living in the inner earth? :o
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on May 15, 2017, 10:44:19 AM
National Geographic: The Amazing Dinosaur Found (Accidentally) by Miners in Canada (http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/06/dinosaur-nodosaur-fossil-discovery/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20170512ngm-nodosaur&utm_campaign=Content&sf78249449=1)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on October 19, 2017, 02:34:27 AM
Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity came to light when two neutron stars collided emitting gravitational waves as detected by ALIGO -- Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory -- located in the US & Italy.

Data culled from more than 70 observatories worldwide, and the involvement of over 3000 researchers, yielded the missing link to Einstein's prediction answered a century later.  While the ALIGOs were able to detect the gravitational waves and black holes up to now, the lack of observing the collision of the two neutron stars left the question unanswered -- basically the how part.  The latter came to fruition leaving space observers in a state of awe and elation:

Quote
"In 1916, Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves or ripples in space-time, squeezing and squashing of dimensions, due to violent movement of massive objects in the universe. Einstein predicted gravitational waves as part of his General Relativity Theory, in which he sought to predict how the force of gravity works in space and time," says Prof Razzaque.

"However, gravitational waves are very faint and their detection is extremely challenging. It was only on September 14, 2015, that the first Gravitational Wave event, known among researchers as GW150914, was finally detected. Two instruments in the USA, called ALIGO, picked up the signals created by the collision of two huge black holes," he adds.

"The one black hole was 36 times the mass of the sun, and the other 29 times the mass of the sun. After that, ALIGO detected several more black hole mergers. But a key puzzle piece to understand gravitational waves remained missing: the ability to detect the collision, or merger, of two neutron stars," adds Razzaque.

Quote
"Finally, the puzzle piece Einstein has been looking for came to light as it were. The combined data also showed that the 17 August gamma ray burst, which only lasted a few seconds, was created by the merging of two neutron stars, which then produced an explosion, called a kilonova," says Prof Razzaque.

"Next, the kilonova emitted visible light from the burning of radio-active materials of the stars for several days. In that burning, which was a nuclear reaction taking place in a short period of time, gold and platinum were produced. The process is called rapid nuclear synthesis, the main mechanism to produce Gold and Platinum in the universe," concludes Prof Razzaque.

Simply put, a cataclysmic event in the world of astrophysics.  Albert Einstein would be proud.


https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-10/uoj-han101817.php (https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-10/uoj-han101817.php)


Also:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/neutron-star-collision-gravitational-waves-gold-metal-precious-ligo-a8003146.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/neutron-star-collision-gravitational-waves-gold-metal-precious-ligo-a8003146.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: moon111 on December 12, 2017, 04:55:31 AM
People Who Constantly Point Out Grammar Mistakes Are Pretty Much Jerks, Scientists Find

http://www.sciencealert.com/people-who-pick-up-grammar-mistakes-jerks-scientists-find
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on January 15, 2018, 09:27:27 AM

If you're a physics teacher, this is a gem. No one was seriously hurt.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on January 15, 2018, 02:18:57 PM
Almost makes for Art Deco style...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/600x480q90/922/Oum7YT.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/600x480q90/923/MRil5t.jpg)


The driver was on narcotics at time of crash.


http://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/17670/somehow-this-guy-crashed-into-the-2nd-floor-of-a-building
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: herman on March 14, 2018, 09:32:04 AM
Pouring one out for a titan of the science community.
Here's a video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRcmqZkGOK4) about the radiation that was named after him from his study on singularities.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on March 14, 2018, 04:16:07 PM
Brilliant scientist Stephen Hawking, who was British, was afflicted with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) or also known as Lou Gehrig disease, a neuromuscular disorder, defied the medical odds and outlived the disease until his death today at 76.

Considered by many to be the world's greatest living scientist, Hawking was also a cosmologist, astronomer, mathematician and author of numerous books including the landmark "A Brief History of Time," which has sold more than 10 million copies.

With fellow physicist Roger Penrose, Hawking merged Einstein's theory of relativity with quantum theory to suggest that space and time would begin with the Big Bang and end in black holes. Hawking also discovered that black holes were not completely black but emit radiation and would likely eventually evaporate and disappear.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/14/health/stephen-hawking-dead/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/14/health/stephen-hawking-dead/index.html)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: AvroArrow on April 05, 2018, 07:41:47 PM
These guys are gonna get so sued!
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2018/04/05/documents-show-shell-foresaw-climate-change-three-decades-ago-and-knew-how-big-its-own-contribution-was/?utm_term=.fbe55aa296cc
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: Bullfrog on September 28, 2018, 03:54:42 PM
60,000 structures discovered in the Guatemalan jungle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39PGjDU_feI

Most of this was known, but the new technology of LiDAR has uncovered how vast the development was. They're suggesting up to 10 million people lived here.
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on December 21, 2018, 07:19:21 AM
The planet Saturn losing it's rings:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/saturn-rings-1.4954045 (https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/saturn-rings-1.4954045)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 12, 2019, 04:24:49 AM
Black hole captured by planet-wide telescopes.  It is considered by many to be the gateway to another dimension.  In accordance  with Einstein’s Theory of Relativity of space, time, and energy, a Black hole  is where nothing can escape or return from it.

Quote
"Although they are relatively simple objects, black holes raise some of the most complex questions about the nature of space and time, and ultimately of our existence," he said.

"It is remarkable that the image we observe is so similar to that which we obtain from our theoretical calculations. So far, it looks like Einstein is correct once again."

One of the greatest mysteries of the universe, now uncovered but still so little understood.  Thanks to MIT physicist Katie Bouman, whose algorithm helped piece the data of the EHT — Event Horizon Telescope — the eight telescopes that were placed all around the planet.

An achievement more than ten years in the making.

Quite the discovery.

Story:  (see video within article)
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47873592 (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47873592)
Title: Re: The Science Thread
Post by: hockeyfan1 on April 17, 2019, 08:23:27 AM
“Proshchay Canada, Privyet Russia”...how the magnetic North Pole is shifting towards Siberian territory and away from it’s place on the Canadian geo map:
(Don’t worry, Santa’s still a Canadian citizen).

(https://imageshack.com/i/poLZSTdIj)

https://www.macleans.ca/society/science/say-goodbye-canada-the-north-pole-is-moving-to-russia/