Maple Leafs News and Views > Main Leafs Hockey Talk

F1: The Importance of Forechecking

(1/4) > >>

herman:
As we ramp up into the new season, it's probably a good time to pour one out for ultimate team player, Zach Hyman.

Here's an oldie, but a goodie from Bourne
https://theathletic.com/581060/2018/10/10/bourne-the-fundamentals-of-an-effective-f1-forechecker-illustrated-by-the-leafs-zack-hyman/


--- Quote ---Here’s one of the biggest points with forechecking: it’s really exhausting – I mean, it’s an all-out sprint – and you never know when it’s going to be worth your while. If you’re beyond a stick length behind the D-man who’s racing back through the D-zone circles to get the puck, you’re creating a turnover a small percentage of the time and that usually involves the other guy messing up pretty bad. Yes, that pressure is often worthwhile because it can force the D-man to make a rushed play, so it’s still worth it to your team, but there’s certainly no guarantee you didn’t just do a meaningless windsprint and burn your legs out for the rest of the shift (of which you only get so many) for absolutely nothing. [...]

That means it takes a certain mindset, a certain type of driven athlete who’s in great condition, who’s willing to just hunt and hunt and hunt relentlessly until they create those turnovers that lead to extra possessions, which lead to goals.
--- End quote ---

Towards the end of Jack Han's time with the Marlies, he noted a trend in the team's drafting showing up on the ice: a lot of puck possessors (as was Keefe's wont), and suddenly a dearth of puck getter-backers. The big ones had graduated onto the Leafs (and off the Leafs in most cases).

These past seasons of transactions have started to shift the balance back, which I would argue is the correct order of operations. Players that can do goal-stuff with the puck are expensive on the market and it seems wise to develop them in-house, while puck getters are often offensively underrated by their stats (i.e. potential $$) when they're stuck in bottom-6 roles. I have a hard time finding the reference at the moment, but Bourne mentioned on a podcast somewhere that Dubas had asked Lou to pursue Yanni Gourde some years ago while he was toiling in the minors, but was obviously shrugged off (we already had Hyman, Brown, Komarov, Martin, etc.).

In terms of technique and evolution of the art of forechecking, the Leafs preach:

* Stick on puck: stick gets there before you do, so target the puck
* Take out the hands: aim the hips into the hands of the opponent trying to corral the puck; here your size is almost irrelevant as a player's body is going to always be bigger and stronger than hands. Taking out the hands means loose puck with your body between the defender and the puck.
Here's someone else's video on Zach Hyman just gaining inside position on everybody.

OldTimeHockey:

--- Quote from: herman on August 30, 2021, 11:04:23 AM ---As we ramp up into the new season, it's probably a good time to pour one out for ultimate team player, Zach Hyman.

Here's an oldie, but a goodie from Bourne
https://theathletic.com/581060/2018/10/10/bourne-the-fundamentals-of-an-effective-f1-forechecker-illustrated-by-the-leafs-zack-hyman/


--- Quote ---Here’s one of the biggest points with forechecking: it’s really exhausting – I mean, it’s an all-out sprint – and you never know when it’s going to be worth your while. If you’re beyond a stick length behind the D-man who’s racing back through the D-zone circles to get the puck, you’re creating a turnover a small percentage of the time and that usually involves the other guy messing up pretty bad. Yes, that pressure is often worthwhile because it can force the D-man to make a rushed play, so it’s still worth it to your team, but there’s certainly no guarantee you didn’t just do a meaningless windsprint and burn your legs out for the rest of the shift (of which you only get so many) for absolutely nothing. [...]

That means it takes a certain mindset, a certain type of driven athlete who’s in great condition, who’s willing to just hunt and hunt and hunt relentlessly until they create those turnovers that lead to extra possessions, which lead to goals.
--- End quote ---

Towards the end of Jack Han's time with the Marlies, he noted a trend in the team's drafting showing up on the ice: a lot of puck possessors (as was Keefe's wont), and suddenly a dearth of puck getter-backers. The big ones had graduated onto the Leafs (and off the Leafs in most cases).

These past seasons of transactions have started to shift the balance back, which I would argue is the correct order of operations. Players that can do goal-stuff with the puck are expensive on the market and it seems wise to develop them in-house, while puck getters are often offensively underrated by their stats (i.e. potential $$) when they're stuck in bottom-6 roles. I have a hard time finding the reference at the moment, but Bourne mentioned on a podcast somewhere that Dubas had asked Lou to pursue Yanni Gourde some years ago while he was toiling in the minors, but was obviously shrugged off (we already had Hyman, Brown, Komarov, Martin, etc.).

In terms of technique and evolution of the art of forechecking, the Leafs preach:

* Stick on puck: stick gets there before you do, so target the puck
* Take out the hands: aim the hips into the hands of the opponent trying to corral the puck; here your size is almost irrelevant as a player's body is going to always be bigger and stronger than hands. Taking out the hands means loose puck with your body between the defender and the puck.
Here's someone else's video on Zach Hyman just gaining inside position on everybody.

--- End quote ---

Yep, always Stick on Puck and Always skate through the hands. They aren't going anywhere without their hands.

princedpw:
Herman: making dreams come true with a thread on F1

herman:

--- Quote from: princedpw on August 30, 2021, 12:19:46 PM ---Herman: making dreams come true with a thread on F1

--- End quote ---

herman:
I do miss Connor Brown's forechecking routes: he didn't have the outright hustle and muscle that Hyman has, but he could deceptively manipulate, anticipate defenders and take away their play option. I think he'd be a very good boomerang signing in his low 30s for like 1.25M as a safe checking winger after his upcoming big UFA payday.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version