Poll

What would be your ideal NHL compensation structure?

Hard Cap, same as now
0 (0%)
Soft Cap + Luxury Tax + Hard Cap
3 (15%)
Soft Cap + Luxury Tax(NBA model)
11 (55%)
No Cap
6 (30%)

Total Members Voted: 20

Voting closed: July 04, 2019, 09:15:20 AM

Author Topic: The Salary Cap  (Read 686 times)

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Offline Dappleganger

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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2019, 01:10:38 PM »
A hard cap system that is for the greater good of all seems very, well....... communist.

Communist would be if the players owned the league and every player was paid the same.  ;)

Offline Nik Bethune

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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2019, 03:03:57 PM »
I guess I threw that term out without really knowing enough about that. Non-guaranteed contracts in the NFL work both ways? Players can back out of them as well?

Not technically, no. But you do have players on team-friendly deals who hold-out and either don't play or only play after teams agree to renegotiate.

But just in general I think it's something to think about when we talk about non-guaranteed deals. We always think of them as one way situations.
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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2019, 03:03:57 PM »

Offline CarltonTheBear

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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2019, 03:14:28 PM »
Not technically, no. But you do have players on team-friendly deals who hold-out and either don't play or only play after teams agree to renegotiate.

But just in general I think it's something to think about when we talk about non-guaranteed deals. We always think of them as one way situations.

Ah ok, I understand then. Non-guaranteed deals would certainly allow GMs to get a little more creative in their deals, which I think is really what's missing in the current CBA set-up. I'd imagine the players would need a minimum guarantee of like 50% for everyone (plus like you said allowing players/teams to negotiate a higher number in some instances) for them to be interested.

Offline L K

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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2019, 03:51:22 PM »
Soft lower and upper end cap.

If you go below the cap you lose equalization payments.  If you go over the cap you pay a graduated luxury tax:  1:1 then 2:1 then 3:1 with an eventual hard cap.

I'm also a fan of only allowing teams to go above the cap for player retention rather than free agency.

Offline hockeyfan1

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Re: The Salary Cap
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2019, 07:16:06 PM »
I, too, prefer no cap, but if I had to choose then itd be the NBA model which has some hard cap provisions built in.  In addition to the luxury tax, there is also this:

2. Certain components of the NBA's system function as a hard cap under specific circumstances.

20. Further restrictions kick-in once a team crosses a point known as the Apron. In 2017-18 the Apron is the point $6 million above the tax threshold. In subsequent seasons the Apron rises or falls by one-half the percentage that the salary cap rises or falls.

Here are the tax and Apron amounts in each season:

Season   Tax Level   Apron
2017-18   $119,266,000   $125,266,000
2018-19   $123,733,000   $129,817,000

In other words, when a team is below the Apron and uses its Bi-Annual exception, receives a player who is signed-and-traded, or uses its Mid-Level exception to sign a player to a contract larger than allowed by the Taxpayer Mid-Level exception, the team becomes hard-capped at the Apron for the remainder of that season. This eliminates any potential loophole where a team could first use one of these exceptions and subsequently add salary to go above the Apron, since the reverse -- adding salary first and then using the exception -- would be illegal.

If a team is hard-capped, it cannot exceed the Apron under any circumstance. If the team subsequently needs to sign a player (for example, to replace injured players) it must first create room under the Apron by waiving player(s) with non-guaranteed salary, waiving player(s) with guaranteed salary and utilizing the stretch provision, trading downward in salary, etc. A team that is hard-capped can sign players to non-guaranteed contracts for training camp or the regular season, but must rid themselves of such players before their salary would take the team above the Apron.
A team subject to the hard cap can also sign players to Rest-of-Season contracts during the season, as long as the salary pro-ration keeps the team below the Apron.

25.
  Exceptions explained


http://www.cbafaq.com/salarycap.htm