Author Topic: Tactics: The Royal Road  (Read 2424 times)

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Offline WhatIfGodWasALeaf

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2016, 04:51:52 PM »
More related to Tactics in general, and only tangentially related to the Royal Road in that it's based on data collected by the same people, and still in the nascent manual stage: The Forechecking Project.

http://www.allaboutthejersey.com/2016/11/7/13478980/high-level-analysis-new-jersey-devils-forecheck

In the context of this year's New Jersey Devils, Ryan Stimson looks into their forecheck specifics against score effects (leading, tied, trailing).

Quote
[The Forecheck Project] will largely deal in score effects and how a team's performance changes based upon the period and score state of a game. [...] [Teams] will adopt different styles of play when they are leading or trailing, mostly in the third period. Teams will pick their spots as far when to try and enter the zone when ahead, and teams will get into the zone by any means possible when trailing.

This piece is a high-level look at what we're seeing early in the data with respect to the risk-reward nature of how aggressive should teams forecheck.

It's a lengthy read, but it definitely has potential, and dovetails nicely with how Babcock has been gradually steering the Leafs to play (see defensive pinch strategy).

Basically, being aggressive on the forecheck all the time (especially with the lead) yields better results and is worth the occasional mistake. Defense through puck possession, driven by aggressive puck retrieval in all zones.

aKa the Dubas/Keefe method.

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2016, 12:02:01 PM »

Is there a relationship between shooting percentage and shooting distance? I think raw distance is merely part of the equation.

I know the Leafs are where they are on this chart largely by design. Cross-ice (Royal Road) passes, cycle plays from behind the net, working the puck deep, generally means shots from in close, and potting dirty rebounds are how Babcock likes his teams to generate goals. Even shots from the point in Babcock's system are more about rebound generation than outright goalscoring.

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2017, 10:16:19 AM »
Invalid Tweet IDwww.twitter.com/ml_han/status/789498541777555456

It's something I believe we all innately understand as fans of the game (which players are good at scoring), but it's quite interesting what other corollaries crop up when that holistic understanding of what is a good goal scorer is boiled down to its essentials, as it let's us find players who do these things well consistently, but just haven't had the results to show for it.

Han, in isolating that scoring is essentially a game about who can generate space-time for themselves (or as a team), reiterates it in this video, spelling out what makes someone like McDavid or Gretzky exceptional: separation ability.

Invalid Tweet IDwww.twitter.com/ml_han/status/804196502532980737

So it's pretty obvious why certain players (e.g. Matthews, Marner, Nylander, Gardiner, Kadri, Brown) are better than others.

Online hockeyfan1

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2017, 02:32:32 PM »
Han, in isolating that scoring is essentially a game about who can generate space-time for themselves (or as a team), reiterates it in this video, spelling out what makes someone like McDavid or Gretzky exceptional: separation ability.

Invalid Tweet IDwww.twitter.com/ml_han/status/804196502532980737

So it's pretty obvious why certain players (e.g. Matthews, Marner, Nylander, Gardiner, Kadri, Brown) are better than others.


Definite difference in the techniques of Gretzky and McDavid.  Speed and how it's applied relative to the action in progress plus the team (or linemates) creating a synergy.

In Gretzky's day, the Oilers were a team built around him.  They all exhibited the similar style that blended and flowed from there.  Gretzky had his linemates and they all clicked efficiently one way or another, with Wayne as the centre of distraction for the opposition, lending credence to the 2vs1, or1vs2.  Add to the fsct thst those Oilers played similarly or "tactically" in their own way yet as one.

McDavid hasn't quite reached the level of Gretzky, taking into consideration the fact that the Oilers are still a team in transition.  Getting there, though, and won't be surprised to see a successful and dominant Edmonton outfit.  Not quite like in Gretzky's yime, but consistent.   McDavid let's his speed encapsulate the end result with glaring efficiency, which makes him among the leagues more dangerous scorers in that regard.  His technique speaks volumes and gives him an advantageous tactic coupled with his creative sublety or explosiveness at scoring & playmaking.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2017, 02:36:47 PM by hockeyfan1 »

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2017, 03:26:12 PM »
Regardless of the method of separation employed (McDavid's speed, Gretzky's vision), it boils down to puck handling.

Really good players that you can build teams around are the ones that can hold onto the puck longer than others under duress, and make plays where there are normally none to be made. These are the guys that come out of 1v2s or even 1v3s with the puck regularly.

This is also why I kind of don't care about hitting. Going for a hit means you a) don't have the puck, b) are not in position to get the puck because your stick is off the ice, c) likely to end up on your butt or behind the play.

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2017, 01:13:12 PM »
www.twitter.com/Cane_Matt/status/837654874191888385

The MIT Sloan Sports conference was this past weekend, and Matt Cane and Ryan Stimson of hockey-graphs put together the results of their Passing Project in the context of defensive play and created this poster.

Tyler Dellow was also in attendance and reported his observations on The Athletic today.
https://theathletic.com/42319/2017/03/06/hockey-is-progressing-tyler-dellows-takeaways-from-the-mit-sloan-sports-analytics-conference/

There are some really cool data/technology outfits gathering a really good deal of play-by-play information, but don't have the hockey insight to know what to do with it, and there are some very very good hockey brains in the public sphere that have to painstakingly put their data together manually from volunteers hours. There's a fit for the betterment of the sport here, but there's also competitive advantage for the teams that can do this on the down low.

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2017, 11:35:37 PM »
Invalid Tweet IDwww.twitter.com/ml_han/status/874814615896682496

This 1-Minute Tactics video focuses on the 1-3-1 PP scheme's lynchpin, the Hole.
Zaitsev
Gardiner
Marner
Bozak
Kadri
Nylander
Brown
Matthews
JvR
Komarov

The cast rotated a bit (Kadri/Brown swap, mix of D) but the scheme was generally the same (with slightly different emphases between the lines based on strengths): strong side playmakers on the half walls, bumpers on the back and in front of the net, disruptors/generators/cleanup in the middle. The scheme is designed to keep the puck in the kill zone between the dots and the goal mouth, preying on side to side (Royal Road) movement and making a deliberate mess to pounce on. As mentioned throughout the season, they deliberately avoided traditional PP schemes of cross-ice one-timers due to a) not really having a huge slap-threat; b) keeping pressure in the zone, and not blasting out back wall rebounds or injuring forwards.

Something to look forward to in a year or two: Johnsson and/or Timashov on the LW halfwall allowing for Matthews to play the Hole, where he is most dangerous.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2017, 11:38:04 PM by herman »

Offline herman

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2017, 10:20:46 AM »
https://the1stpass.wordpress.com/2017/05/28/erie-otters-transition-game-a-theory-on-creating-offence/

This article is from last month (hat tip to WIGWAL) and is a compelling look at the modern game style that the Leafs, Penguins, and other teams (TBL, NSH come to mind) are looking to play.

It boils down to
  • North-South through the neutral zone
  • East-West in the offensive zone

Pretty obvious stuff: you want to play fast through transition so you can set up before the other team's defense gets structured. In the OZ, you want to pin pressure in and take advantage of moving the goaltender side-to-side (Royal Road). Speed, Skill, and Smarts are what you need to play this way.

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Re: Tactics: The Royal Road
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2017, 10:20:46 AM »